See also: Bato, bato-, and Bāto

AklanonEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-Malayo-Polynesian *batu.

NounEdit

bato

  1. stone

AlanganEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-Philippine *batu, from Proto-Malayo-Polynesian *batu, from Proto-Austronesian *batu.

NounEdit

bató

  1. stone
  2. Kidney

Antillean CreoleEdit

EtymologyEdit

From French bateau.

NounEdit

bato

  1. boat

AwabakalEdit

NounEdit

bato

  1. water
    Synonyms: kokoin, yarro
    • 1892, An Australian Language as Spoken by the Awabakal[1] (in English):
      Bato, m., water

ReferencesEdit


Bikol CentralEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-Philippine *batu, from Proto-Malayo-Polynesian *batu, from Proto-Austronesian *batu.

PronunciationEdit

  • Hyphenation: ba‧to
  • IPA(key): /baˈto/

NounEdit

bató

  1. (anatomy) kidney
  2. (Daet) rock; stone
    Synonym: gapo

CalóEdit

Alternative formsEdit

NounEdit

bato m (plural batuces)

  1. father
    Synonyms: batico, (affectionate) dada

ReferencesEdit

  • bato” in J. Tineo Rebolledo, A Chipicalli (La Llengua Gitana), Granada: Gómez de la Cruz, 1900, →OCLC, page 18.
  • bato” in Flamenco - Caló, El Flamenco.
  • bato” in Vocabulario : Caló - Español, Portal del Flamenco y Universidad.

CatalanEdit

VerbEdit

bato

  1. first-person singular present indicative form of batre

CebuanoEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-Malayo-Polynesian *batu, from Proto-Austronesian *batu. Compare Fijian vatu, Hawaiian haku, Hiligaynon bato, Indonesian batu, Kapampangan batu, Malagasy vato, Malay batu and Maori whatu.

NounEdit

bato

  1. a stone; a pebble, rock, or boulder
  2. a gem
  3. a calculus in the kidney; a kidney stone
  4. a gallstone
  5. (metonymically) the kidney
  6. (bingo) a token, a pebble or seed used to mark a bingo card.

VerbEdit

bato

  1. to stone; to pelt with stones
  2. (by extension) to hurl an object at someone or something
  3. to throw out a question
  4. to embroil; to cause to be involved
  5. to turn into stone
  6. to harden like a rock

AdjectiveEdit

bato

  1. made or built of stone
  2. made of concrete building material
  3. hard as stone; stonehard
  4. resembling a rock or stone; rocklike; stonelike

QuotationsEdit

For quotations using this term, see Citations:bato.

Derived termsEdit


ErromintxelaEdit

NounEdit

bato

  1. father

ReferencesEdit

  • bato” in Alexandre Baudrimont, Vocabulaire de la langue des Bohémiens habitant les pays basques français, Bordeaux: G. Gounouilhou, 1862, →OCLC, page 43.

EsperantoEdit

EtymologyEdit

From bati +‎ -o

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): [ˈbato]
  • Rhymes: -ato
  • Hyphenation: bat‧o
  • (file)

NounEdit

bato (accusative singular baton, plural batoj, accusative plural batojn)

  1. blow, hit, strike, stroke (physical attack, punch)
    Synonym: frapo

Haitian CreoleEdit

EtymologyEdit

From French bateau (boat).

NounEdit

bato

  1. boat, ship

HigaononEdit

NounEdit

bato

  1. stone, rock

HiligaynonEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Proto-Malayo-Polynesian *batu, from Proto-Austronesian *batu (compare Cebuano bato, Fijian vatu, Hawaiian haku, Ilocano bato, Indonesian batu, Kapampangan batu, Malagasy vato, Malay batu, Maori whatu, Sundanese batu, Tagalog bato).

NounEdit

bató

  1. rock, stone, cobble

VerbEdit

bató

  1. to stone

Etymology 2Edit

NounEdit

báto

  1. a complete thing, the whole
  2. a piece of anything that is round or cubic in shape

VerbEdit

bátò

  1. to resist or oppose
  2. to rise up
  3. to backtalk

IdoEdit

NounEdit

bato (plural bati)

  1. beating

Derived termsEdit


IlocanoEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-Malayo-Polynesian *batu, from Proto-Austronesian *batu (compare Cebuano bato, Fijian vatu, Hawaiian haku, Hiligaynon bato, Indonesian batu, Kapampangan batu, Malagasy vato, Malay batu, Maori whatu, Sundanese batu, Tagalog bato).

NounEdit

bato

  1. rock, stone, cobble

ItalianEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from Late Latin batus, from Ancient Greek βάτος (bátos), from Hebrew בַּת(bat).

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /ˈba.to/
  • Rhymes: -ato
  • Hyphenation: bà‧to

NounEdit

bato m (plural bati)

  1. (historical) bath (unit of liquid measure)

ReferencesEdit

  • bato in Treccani.it – Vocabolario Treccani on line, Istituto dell'Enciclopedia Italiana

KankanaeyEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-Philippine *batu, from Proto-Malayo-Polynesian *batu, from Proto-Austronesian *batu.

NounEdit

bato

  1. rock; stone

LatinEdit

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

batō

  1. dative/ablative singular of batus

LingalaEdit

NounEdit

bato 2

  1. plural of moto

MansakaEdit

EtymologyEdit

From batu, Proto-Malayo-Polynesian *batu.

NounEdit

bato

  1. stone

MaranaoEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-Philippine *batu, from Proto-Malayo-Polynesian *batu, from Proto-Austronesian *batu.

NounEdit

bato

  1. stone; rock
  2. (gambling) chips

Derived termsEdit


MasbatenyoEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-Philippine *batu, from Proto-Malayo-Polynesian *batu, from Proto-Austronesian *batu.

NounEdit

bató

  1. stone; rock

Mauritian CreoleEdit

EtymologyEdit

From French bateau

NounEdit

bato

  1. boat

ReferencesEdit

  • Phillip Baker; Vinesh Y. Hookoomsing (1987) Dictionnaire de créole mauricien. Morisyen – English – Français

PortugueseEdit

PronunciationEdit

VerbEdit

bato

  1. first-person singular (eu) present indicative of bater

RatagnonEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-Philippine *batu, from Proto-Malayo-Polynesian *batu, from Proto-Austronesian *batu.

NounEdit

bató

  1. stone

SambaliEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-Philippine *batu, from Proto-Malayo-Polynesian *batu, from Proto-Austronesian *batu.

NounEdit

bató

  1. stone; rock

Seychellois CreoleEdit

EtymologyEdit

From French bateau

NounEdit

bato

  1. boat

ReferencesEdit

  • Danielle D’Offay et Guy Lionnet, Diksyonner Kreol - Franse / Dictionnaire Créole Seychellois - Français

SpanishEdit

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /ˈbato/, [ˈba.t̪o]
  • Hyphenation: ba‧to

Etymology 1Edit

Probably from Ancient Greek βάττος (báttos, stutterer), of imitative origin. See also βατταλογέω (battalogéō, to stammer), English bay4 (to bark, bay, howl).[1]

NounEdit

bato m (plural batos)

  1. (dated) dork, dimwit
  2. (Latin America, informal) young man, youth
  3. (Mexico, colloquial) chump, punk
  4. (Mexico, colloquial) dude, guy, buddy

Etymology 2Edit

From Caló bato.

NounEdit

bato m (plural batos)

  1. (Spain, slang) father
    Synonyms: padre, papá, jefe

VerbEdit

bato

  1. First-person singular (yo) present indicative form of batir.

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ Roberts, Edward A. (2014) A Comprehensive Etymological Dictionary of the Spanish Language with Families of Words based on Indo-European Roots, Xlibris Corporation, →ISBN

Further readingEdit


TagalogEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-Malayo-Polynesian *batu, from Proto-Austronesian *batu. Compare Cebuano bato, Fijian vatu, Hawaiian haku, Hiligaynon bato, Ilocano bato, Indonesian batu, Kapampangan batu, Malagasy vato, Malay batu, Maori whatu, Niuean patu, Pangasinan bato, Sundanese batu, and Waray-Waray bato.

Pronunciation 1Edit

  • Hyphenation: ba‧to
  • IPA(key): /baˈto/, [bɐˈto]
  • (file)

NounEdit

bató

  1. stone
  2. (anatomy) kidney
  3. gallstone
  4. gem; jewel
    Synonym: hiyas
  5. knot in wood
  6. (idiomatic, colloquial) bored person
  7. (slang) methamphetamine
    Synonym: shabu
Derived termsEdit

AdjectiveEdit

bató

  1. (figuratively) niggardly; miserly
  2. (figuratively) stubborn; unyielding
  3. (idiomatic, colloquial) bored

Pronunciation 2Edit

  • Hyphenation: ba‧to
  • IPA(key): /ˈbatoʔ/

NounEdit

batò

  1. chief piece in a game of native quoits called tangga
Derived termsEdit

TernateEdit

AdverbEdit

bato

  1. only, exclusively
    haka ngori maobo batogive me only the bone
  2. just, merely
    ana isedu batothey just joked

ReferencesEdit

  • Rika Hayami-Allen (2001) A descriptive study of the language of Ternate, the northern Moluccas, Indonesia, University of Pittsburgh