See also: végétal

Contents

EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Late Latin vegetalis, from Latin vegetāre.

PronunciationEdit

AdjectiveEdit

vegetal ‎(comparative more vegetal, superlative most vegetal)

  1. (now rare, historical) Capable of growth and reproduction, but not feeling or reason (often opposed to sensible and rational). [from 15th c.]
    • 1621, Robert Burton, The Anatomy of Melancholy, III.2.1.i:
      Which although it be denominated from men, and most evident in them, yet it extends and shows itself in vegetal and sensible creatures […].
  2. Pertaining to vegetables or plants. [from 16th c.]
  3. (wine) Having a grassy, herbaceous taste.

TranslationsEdit

NounEdit

vegetal ‎(plural vegetals)

  1. (obsolete, chiefly botany) Any vegetable organism.
    • Burton
      This melancholy extends itself not to men only, but even to vegetals and sensibles.

CatalanEdit

AdjectiveEdit

vegetal m, f ‎(masculine and feminine plural vegetals)

  1. relating to plants or vegetables

PortugueseEdit

NounEdit

vegetal m (plural vegetais)

  1. vegetable (edible material derived from a plant)
  2. (figuratively) vegetable (person whose body or brain has been damaged so that they cannot interact with the surrounding environment)

SynonymsEdit

AdjectiveEdit

vegetal m, f ‎(plural vegetais, comparable)

  1. Relative to plants and vegetables
    Célula vegetal.

SpanishEdit

Spanish Wikipedia has an article on:

Wikipedia es

AdjectiveEdit

vegetal m, f ‎(plural vegetales)

  1. vegetal

NounEdit

vegetal m ‎(plural vegetales)

  1. vegetable

SynonymsEdit

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