viscus

EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From New Latin, from Latin viscus (any internal organ of the body), perhaps akin to English viscid.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

viscus (plural viscera)

  1. (anatomy) One of the organs, as the brain, heart, or stomach, in the great cavities of the body of an animal; especially used in the plural, and applied to the organs contained in the abdomen.
  2. Specifically, the intestines.

SynonymsEdit

Derived termsEdit

TranslationsEdit

See alsoEdit

ReferencesEdit


LatinEdit

EtymologyEdit

Unknown.[1]

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

viscus n (genitive visceris); third declension

  1. Any internal organ of the body.
  2. entrails, viscera

InflectionEdit

Third declension neuter.

Number Singular Plural
nominative viscus viscera
genitive visceris viscerum
dative viscerī visceribus
accusative viscus viscera
ablative viscere visceribus
vocative viscus viscera

Related termsEdit

DescendantsEdit

ReferencesEdit

  • viscus in Charlton T. Lewis & Charles Short, A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press, 1879
  1. ^ Michiel de Vaan (2008), Etymological Dictionary of Latin and the other Italic Languages, Leiden, Boston: Brill Academic Publishers
Last modified on 17 April 2014, at 12:20