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EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From New Latin, from Latin viscus (any internal organ of the body), perhaps akin to English viscid.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

viscus (plural viscera)

  1. (anatomy) One of the organs, as the brain, heart, or stomach, in the great cavities of the body of an animal; especially used in the plural, and applied to the organs contained in the abdomen.
  2. Specifically, the intestines.

SynonymsEdit

Derived termsEdit

TranslationsEdit

See alsoEdit

ReferencesEdit


LatinEdit

EtymologyEdit

Of unclear origin;[1] possibly Proto-Indo-European *weys- (to turn, rotate).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

viscus n (genitive visceris); third declension

  1. Any internal organ of the body.
  2. (anatomy) entrails, viscera

InflectionEdit

Third declension neuter.

Case Singular Plural
nominative viscus viscera
genitive visceris viscerum
dative viscerī visceribus
accusative viscus viscera
ablative viscere visceribus
vocative viscus viscera

Related termsEdit

DescendantsEdit

ReferencesEdit

  • viscus in Charlton T. Lewis and Charles Short (1879) A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press
  • viscus in Charlton T. Lewis (1891) An Elementary Latin Dictionary, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • viscus” in Félix Gaffiot’s Dictionnaire Illustré Latin-Français, Hachette (1934)
  • Roberts, A Comprehensive Etymological Dictionary of the Spanish Language with Families of Words based on Indo-European Roots
  1. ^ De Vaan, Michiel (2008) Etymological Dictionary of Latin and the other Italic Languages (Leiden Indo-European Etymological Dictionary Series; 7), Leiden, Boston: Brill