See also: waer, wär, and ƿær

Middle EnglishEdit

NounEdit

wær

  1. Alternative form of werre

Old EnglishEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Proto-Germanic *waraz. Cognate with Old Saxon war, Old High German war, Old Norse varr, Gothic 𐍅𐌰𐍂 (war).

PronunciationEdit

AdjectiveEdit

wær (comparative wærra, superlative wærest)

  1. cautious, on guard, watching out for something (+genitive)
DeclensionEdit
Derived termsEdit

Etymology 2Edit

From Proto-Germanic *wēraz (true), from Proto-Indo-European *weh₁-. Germanic cognates include Old High German wār, wāra (German wahr), Old Saxon wār (Low German war), Old Dutch wār (Dutch waar), Old Norse várar pl. The Indo-European root is also the source of Latin vērus, Old Irish fír (Irish fíor), Welsh cywir, Old Church Slavonic вѣра (věra), Russian ве́ра (véra).

PronunciationEdit

AdjectiveEdit

wǣr

  1. true, correct (only attested once)
    Iċ ġelȳfe þæt hit from Gode cōme, brōht from his bysene, þæs mē þes boda sæġde wǣrum wordum.
    I believe that it came from God, brought from His example, for this messenger told me in true words.
DeclensionEdit
SynonymsEdit
Derived termsEdit

NounEdit

wǣr f (nominative plural wǣra or wǣre)

  1. truth, faith
  2. fidelity, friendship
  3. agreement, promise
DeclensionEdit