EnglishEdit

PronunciationEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Middle English wem, wemme, from Old English wamm (stain, spot, scar, disgrace, defect, defilement, sin, evil, crime, injury, loss, hurt, misfortune), from Proto-Germanic *wammaz (stain, spot), from Proto-Indo-European *wem- (to spew, vomit). Cognate with Icelandic vamm (loss, damage), Latin vomō (vomit, verb) (English vomit), Ancient Greek ἐμέω (eméō, I spew) (English emesis), Lithuanian vemti (to vomit), Sanskrit वमति (vamati, to vomit)

Alternative formsEdit

NounEdit

wem (plural wems)

  1. (UK dialectal) A spot; stain; mark; scar; weal; bruise.
  2. (UK dialectal) A (moral) blemish; fault; blemish; taint.
  3. (UK dialectal) Neglect; damage.

Derived termsEdit

Etymology 2Edit

From Middle English wemmen, from Old English wemman (to defile, besmirch, profane, injure, ill-treat, destroy, abuse, revile), from Proto-Germanic *wammijaną (to stain), from Proto-Indo-European *wem- (to spew, vomit).

VerbEdit

wem (third-person singular simple present wems, present participle wemming, simple past and past participle wemmed)

  1. (transitive, UK dialectal) To injure or disfigure; blemish; mark; scar.
  2. (transitive, UK dialectal) To defile; pollute; corrupt; vitiate.
  3. (transitive, UK dialectal) To violate (one's word).

Derived termsEdit

AnagramsEdit


GermanEdit

PronunciationEdit

PronounEdit

wem

  1. (interrogative) dative of wer, (to) whom (indirect object).
Last modified on 21 September 2013, at 14:46