See also: vòmit and vomît

EnglishEdit

 
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EtymologyEdit

From Middle English vomiten, from Latin vomitāre, present active infinitive of vomitō (vomit repeatedly), frequentative form of vomō (be sick, vomit), from Proto-Indo-European *wemh₁- (to spew, vomit). Cognate with Old Norse váma (nausea, malaise), Old English wemman (to defile). More at wem.

PronunciationEdit

  • (UK) enPR: vŏm'it, IPA(key): /ˈvɒmɪt/
  • Rhymes: -ɒmɪt
  • (US) enPR: vŏm'it, IPA(key): /ˈvɑmɪt/
  • (file)

VerbEdit

vomit (third-person singular simple present vomits, present participle vomiting, simple past and past participle vomited)

  1. (intransitive) To regurgitate or eject the contents of the stomach through the mouth; puke.
  2. (transitive) To regurgitate and discharge (something swallowed); to spew.
    • 1988, Angela Carter, ‘Peter Carey: Oscar and Lucinda’, in Shaking a Leg, Vintage 2013, p. 713:
      It is the illicit Christmas pudding an incorrigible servant cooks for the little boy one Christmas Day that sparks Oscar's first crisis of belief, for his father, opposed to Christmas pudding on theological grounds, makes the child vomit his helping.
  3. To eject from any hollow place; to belch forth; to emit.
    • 1634 October 9 (first performance), [John Milton], H[enry] Lawes, editor, A Maske Presented at Ludlow Castle, 1634: [] [Comus], London: [] [Augustine Matthews] for Hvmphrey Robinson, [], published 1637, OCLC 228715864; reprinted as Comus: [] (Dodd, Mead & Company’s Facsimile Reprints of Rare Books; Literature Series; no. I), New York, N.Y.: Dodd, Mead & Company, 1903, OCLC 1113942837:
      Like the sons of Vulcan, vomit smoke.
    • 1849, Currer Bell [pseudonym; Charlotte Brontë], Shirley. A Tale. [], volume (please specify |volume=I to III), London: Smith, Elder and Co., [], OCLC 84390265:
      [] a column of smoke, such as might be vomited by a park of artillery
    • 1849 May – 1850 November, Charles Dickens, The Personal History of David Copperfield, London: Bradbury & Evans, [], published 1850, OCLC 558196156:
      There was a chest of drawers with an escritoire top, for Uriah to read or write at of an evening; there was Uriah’s blue bag lying down and vomiting papers; there was a company of Uriah’s books commanded by Mr. Tidd; there was a corner cupboard: and there were the usual articles of furniture.
    • 1907, E.M. Forster, The Longest Journey, Part I, III [Uniform ed., p. 45-46]:
      "Hullo!" said the athlete, and vomited with this greeting a cloud of tobacco-smoke. It must have been imprisoned in his mouth some time, for no pipe was visible.
    • 2012, John Branch, “Snow Fall: The Avalanche at Tunnel Creek”, in New York Time[1]:
      After about a minute, the creek bed vomited the debris into a gently sloped meadow. Saugstad felt the snow slow and tried to keep her hands in front of her.

SynonymsEdit

  • See also Thesaurus:regurgitate
  • Derived termsEdit

    TranslationsEdit

    NounEdit

    vomit (usually uncountable, plural vomits)

    1. The regurgitated former contents of a stomach; vomitus.
    2. The act of regurgitating.
    3. The act of vomiting
      • 1953, Samuel Beckett, Watt, Olympia Press:
        He removes his hat without misgiving, he unbuttons his coat and sits down, proffered all pure and open to the long joys of being himself, like a basin to a vomit.
    4. (obsolete) That which causes vomiting; an emetic.

    SynonymsEdit

    Derived termsEdit

    TranslationsEdit

    See alsoEdit


    FrenchEdit

    PronunciationEdit

    VerbEdit

    vomit

    1. inflection of vomir:
      1. third-person singular present indicative
      2. third-person singular past historic

    LatinEdit

    VerbEdit

    vomit

    1. third-person singular present active indicative of vomō

    RomanianEdit

    PronunciationEdit

    VerbEdit

    vomit

    1. first-person singular present indicative/subjunctive of vomita