vomit

See also: vomît

Contents

EnglishEdit

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EtymologyEdit

PIE root
*wemh₁-

From Middle English vomiten, from Latin vomitāre, present active infinitive of vomitō ‎(vomit repeatedly), frequentative form of vomō ‎(be sick, vomit), from Proto-Indo-European *wemh₁- ‎(to spew, vomit). Cognate with Old Norse váma ‎(nausea, malaise), Old English wemman ‎(to defile). More at wem.

PronunciationEdit

VerbEdit

vomit ‎(third-person singular simple present vomits, present participle vomiting, simple past and past participle vomited)

  1. To regurgitate or eject the contents of the stomach through the mouth; puke.
    • Bible, Jonah ii. 10
      The fish [] vomited out Jonah upon the dry land.
  2. To eject from any hollow place; to belch forth; to emit.
    • 2012 May 26, John Branch, “Snow Fall : The Avalanche at Tunnel Creek”, in New York Time[1]:
      After about a minute, the creek bed vomited the debris into a gently sloped meadow. Saugstad felt the snow slow and tried to keep her hands in front of her.
    • Milton
      Like the sons of Vulcan, vomit smoke.
    • Charlotte Brontë
      a column of smoke, such as might be vomited by a park of artillery

Derived termsEdit

SynonymsEdit

TranslationsEdit

NounEdit

vomit ‎(uncountable)

  1. The regurgitated former contents of a stomach.
  2. The act of regurgitating.
  3. (obsolete) That which causes vomiting; an emetic.
    • Shakespeare
      He gives your Hollander a vomit.

SynonymsEdit

TranslationsEdit

See alsoEdit


FrenchEdit

LatinEdit

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