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See also: wer- and WER

Contents

EnglishEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Middle English wer, from Old English wer (a male being, man, husband, hero), from Proto-Germanic *weraz (man), from Proto-Indo-European *wiHrós (man, freeman). Cognate with Middle High German wër (man), Swedish värbror (brother-in-law), Norwegian verfader (father-in-law), Latin vir (man, husband).

NounEdit

wer (plural wers)

  1. (obsolete) A man.
  2. (obsolete) Wergeld.

Related termsEdit

AnagramsEdit


CornishEdit

AdjectiveEdit

wer

  1. Soft mutation of gwer.

GermanEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-Germanic *hwaz, from Proto-Indo-European *kʷis. Related to wo.

PronunciationEdit

PronounEdit

wer

  1. (interrogative) who
    Wer hat das gesagt?Who said that?
  2. (interrogative, colloquial) what (see usage notes)
  3. (indefinite, colloquial) somebody, someone
    Da ist wer an der Tür. – There's somebody at the door.

Usage notesEdit

  • (what): In colloquial German, wer and its forms may be used in reference to things. This is often done when asking about a noun whose gender one knows to be masculine or feminine. For example: Kannst du mir mal den Dings rübergeben?Wen? (“Could you pass me the thingamabob?” – “Pass what?”) In this case, the interrogative mirrors the gender of the noun one asks about.
  • (someone): The colloquial wer meaning “someone” cannot usually be the first word in a main clause, because it could be misinterpreted as an interrogative in this position. There is an exception is when it is followed by a nominalized adjective: Wer Neues ist in die Mannschaft gekommen. – “Someone new joined the team.” It is however frequently used at the beginning of subordinate clauses preceding a main clause, e.g Wer etwas nicht verstanden hat, kann jederzeit nachfragen - “If you haven't understood something, you can ask at any time.” Many adages work in this way, e.g. Wer anderen eine Grube gräbt, fällt selbst hinein. - (lit.) “He who digs a pit for others, will fall into it himself” (meaning “If you work with malice against others, you will be struck in the same way”).

InflectionEdit

SynonymsEdit

Related termsEdit


KurdishEdit

AdverbEdit

wer

  1. so

KuriEdit

NounEdit

wer

  1. water

ReferenceEdit


MeriamEdit

NounEdit

wer

  1. egg
  2. testicle
  3. star

Middle EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old English wer, compare Old Norse verr

NounEdit

wer (plural wers)

  1. a man, a husband
  2. Alternative spelling of war

VerbEdit

wer

  1. were

NdomEdit

NounEdit

wer

  1. water

ReferenceEdit

  • Oceanic linguistics, volumes 20 à 21, University Press of Hawaii, page 129, 1981

Old EnglishEdit

 
twēġen weras

PronunciationEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Proto-Germanic *weraz, from Proto-Indo-European *wiHrós (freeman). Germanic cognates include Old Frisian, Old Saxon, Old High German wer, Old Norse verr, Gothic 𐍅𐌰𐌹𐍂 (wair). The Proto-Indo-European root is also the source of Latin vir, Sanskrit वीर (vīrá), Old Irish fer, Welsh gŵr), Lithuanian výras.

NounEdit

wer m

  1. man
  2. husband
  3. (poetic) hero
DeclensionEdit
Derived termsEdit
DescendantsEdit
  • Middle English: wer

Etymology 2Edit

From werian.

NounEdit

wer m (nominative plural weras)

  1. weir

Old High GermanEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Proto-Germanic *weraz, from Proto-Indo-European *wiHrós. Cognate with Old English wer and Old Norse verr.

NounEdit

wer m

  1. man
Derived termsEdit

Etymology 2Edit

From Proto-Germanic *warją

NounEdit

wer n

  1. dam, weir

DescendantsEdit


Old SaxonEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-Germanic *weraz, from Proto-Indo-European *wiHrós. Cognate with Old English wer and Old Norse verr.

NounEdit

wer m

  1. man
  2. hero

DeclensionEdit


Derived termsEdit

DescendantsEdit


SelaruEdit

NounEdit

wer

  1. water

ReferencesEdit

  • Blust's Austronesian Comparative Dictionary