See also: wër and WER

EnglishEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Middle English wer, were, from Old English wer (a male being, man, husband, hero), from Proto-Germanic *weraz (man), from Proto-Indo-European *wiHrós (man, freeman). Cognate with Middle High German wër (man), Swedish värbror (brother-in-law), Norwegian verfader (father-in-law), Latin vir (man, husband), Old Irish fer, Middle Welsh gwr. The original meaning of “man” is now preserved only in compounds like werewolf, were wolf (man-wolf) and wergeld, were gild (man gold (payment)).

 
English Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia

NounEdit

wer (plural wers)

  1. (obsolete or historical) A man; a male; a husband
    • 1862, E. William Robertson, Scotland Under Her Early Kings, page 137:
      [] the character of a horseman was inseparable connected with the knight—the military attendant of the baron, who was himself nothing more than the Wer, or Man, of the king—even the armiger, []
    • 1864, Thomas Oswald Cockayne, Leechdoms, Wortcunning, and Starcraft of Early England [...] from Brit. mus. ms. Cotton. Vitellius C. III, page 205:
      Further is this wort of two kinds, wer and wife, or male and female. The wer, or male, hath white blossoms, and the wife, or female, hath red or brown; either is beneficial and wonderlike, and they have on them wondrous virtue.
  2. (obsolete or historical) A fine for slaying a man; wergeld.
    • 1876, Essays in Anglo-Saxon Law, page 144:
      Under the system of money compensation, the kindred of the slain must demand payment of the wer, or prosecute the feud. They had the right to the wer when paid, and must by oath release the slayer and his kindred from the feud.
    • 1895, Frederick Pollock; Frederic William Maitland, “Inheritance”, in The History of English Law before the Time of Edward I, volume II, Cambridge, Cambridgeshire: At the University Press; Boston, Mass.: Little, Brown, & Company, OCLC 78010698, § 1 (Antiquities), page 239:
      It was so in the England of Alfred's day; the maternal kinsfolk paid a third of the wer. The Leges Henrici, which about such a matter will not be inventing new rules, tell us that the paternal kinsfolk pay and receive two-thirds, the maternal kinsfolk one-third of the wer; and this is borne out by other evidence.

Related termsEdit

AnagramsEdit


CornishEdit

AdjectiveEdit

wer

  1. Soft mutation of gwer.

GermanEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Middle High German wer, from Old High German wer, from Proto-West Germanic *hwaʀ. Related to wo.

PronunciationEdit

PronounEdit

wer

  1. (interrogative) who (what person or people)
    Wer hat das gesagt?Who said that?
  2. (interrogative, colloquial) what, which (one) (see usage notes)
  3. (relative) whoever, he who, someone who, the person who, anyone who (whatever person or persons)
    Wer eine Frage hat, kann sich jetzt melden.
    Whoever has a question, put up their hands now.
  4. (indefinite, colloquial) somebody, someone; anybody, anyone (an unspecified person)
    Da ist wer an der Tür.There's somebody at the door.

Usage notesEdit

  • (what): In colloquial German, wer and its forms may be used in reference to things. This is often done when asking about a noun whose gender one knows to be masculine or feminine. For example: Kannst du mir mal den Dings rübergeben? – Wen? (“Could you pass me the thingamabob?” – “Pass what?”) In this case, the interrogative mirrors the grammatical gender of the noun one asks about.
  • (someone): The colloquial wer meaning “someone” cannot usually be the first word in a main clause, because it could be misinterpreted as an interrogative in this position. The only exception is when it is followed by a nominalized adjective:
    Wer Neues ist in die Mannschaft gekommen.Someone new joined the team.

DeclensionEdit

SynonymsEdit

Coordinate termsEdit

Derived termsEdit

Further readingEdit


HunsrikEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-Germanic *hwaz, from Proto-Indo-European *kʷis.

PronunciationEdit

PronounEdit

wer

  1. (interrogative) who
    Wer kommd dart?
    Who goes there?
    Wer sihst-du?
    Who do you see?

See alsoEdit

Further readingEdit


KuriEdit

NounEdit

wer

  1. water

ReferencesEdit


MeriamEdit

NounEdit

wer

  1. egg
  2. testicle
  3. star

Middle EnglishEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Old English wer, from Proto-Germanic *weraz, from Proto-Indo-European *wiHrós; compare Old Norse verr, Latin vir, Old Prussian wijrs, Sanskrit वीर (vīra).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

wer (plural wers)

  1. a man, a husband
SynonymsEdit
Related termsEdit

AntonymsEdit

  • wif (with respect to gender)

DescendantsEdit

  • English: wer, were

Etymology 2Edit

From Old English wǣre.

VerbEdit

wer

  1. Alternative form of were

Etymology 3Edit

From Late Old English werre, wyrre (war).

NounEdit

wer

  1. Alternative form of werre (war)

NdomEdit

NounEdit

wer

  1. water

ReferencesEdit

  • Oceanic linguistics, volumes 20 à 21, University Press of Hawaii, page 129, 1981

Northern KurdishEdit

AdverbEdit

wer

  1. so

Old EnglishEdit

Alternative formsEdit

PronunciationEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Proto-Germanic *weraz, from Proto-Indo-European *wiHrós (freeman). Germanic cognates include Old Frisian, Old Saxon, Old High German wer, Old Norse verr, Gothic 𐍅𐌰𐌹𐍂 (wair). The Proto-Indo-European root is also the source of Latin vir, Sanskrit वीर (vīrá), Old Irish fer, Welsh gŵr), Lithuanian výras.

NounEdit

wer m

  1. man
  2. husband
  3. (poetic) hero, warrior
  4. (in compounds) civil
    werrēafcivil dress, civil clothing
    werþēodpeople, folk, nation
DeclensionEdit

SynonymsEdit

AntonymsEdit

  • wif (with respect to gender)

Derived termsEdit

DescendantsEdit

Etymology 2Edit

From werian.

NounEdit

wer m (nominative plural weras)

  1. weir

DescendantsEdit


Old High GermanEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Proto-West Germanic *wer, from Proto-Germanic *weraz, from Proto-Indo-European *wiHrós. Cognate with Old English wer and Old Norse verr.

NounEdit

wer m

  1. man
Derived termsEdit

Etymology 2Edit

From Proto-Germanic *warją

NounEdit

wer n

  1. dam, weir

DescendantsEdit


Old SaxonEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-West Germanic *wer, from Proto-Germanic *weraz, from Proto-Indo-European *wiHrós. Cognate with Old English wer and Old Norse verr.

NounEdit

wer m

  1. man
  2. hero

DeclensionEdit


Derived termsEdit

DescendantsEdit


SelaruEdit

NounEdit

wer

  1. water

ReferencesEdit

  • Blust's Austronesian Comparative Dictionary

Tocharian BEdit

EtymologyEdit

(This etymology is missing or incomplete. Please add to it, or discuss it at the Etymology scriptorium.)

NounEdit

wer ?

  1. hatred, enmity

YolaEdit

NounEdit

wer

  1. Alternative form of were