See also: wöning

EnglishEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Middle English woning, wuning, wunnunge, from Old English wunung (act of dwelling, living, dwelling, habitation, inner room of a dwelling), from Proto-Germanic *wunungō, equivalent to wone +‎ -ing. Cognate with Scots wonnyng, wonyng, wonyn (habitation, dwelling, shelter), Dutch woning (dwelling, house), German Wohnung (dwelling, apartment), Swedish våning (floor, apartment, flat).

NounEdit

woning (plural wonings)

  1. (archaic) A place to live; a dwelling; a dwelling-place; an abode.
    • 1852, James A. Sharp, A new gazetteer:
      Near it is a timbered house; an old inn close to the bridge is thought to be the "woning" of "Elynor Humming," the famous ale wife, whose "tunning" is celebrated by Hen. VII.'s poet laureate, Skelton.
    • 1995, Walter Hilton, The Goad of Love:
      [] ordained as a place and a woning for the Holy Ghost, and as of Christ able and possible for to come to endless bliss.
Alternative formsEdit
Derived termsEdit

Etymology 2Edit

From wone (to dwell).

VerbEdit

woning

  1. present participle of wone

AnagramsEdit


DutchEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Middle Dutch woninge. Equivalent to wonen (to live, reside) +‎ -ing.

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /ˈʋoː.nɪŋ/
  • (file)
  • Hyphenation: wo‧ning
  • Rhymes: -oːnɪŋ

NounEdit

woning f (plural woningen, diminutive woninkje n)

  1. house, abode, residence, dwelling

Derived termsEdit

Related termsEdit

DescendantsEdit

  • Afrikaans: woning
  • Negerhollands: wooning