See also: Live

EnglishEdit

 
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Etymology 1Edit

From Middle English lyven, libben, from Old English lifian, libban (to live; be alive), from Proto-Germanic *libjaną, from Proto-Indo-European *leyp- (leave, cling, linger). Cognate with Saterland Frisian líeuwje (to live), West Frisian libje (to live), Dutch leven (to live), German Low German leven, lęven (to live), German leben (to live), Swedish leva (to live), Icelandic lifa (to live), Gothic 𐌻𐌹𐌱𐌰𐌽 (liban, to live).

PronunciationEdit

VerbEdit

live (third-person singular simple present lives, present participle living, simple past and past participle lived)

  1. (intransitive) To be alive; to have life.
    He's not expected to live for more than a few months.
  2. (intransitive) To have permanent residence somewhere, to inhabit, to reside.
    I live at 2a Acacia Avenue.  He lives in LA, but he's staying here over the summer.
    • 1892, Walter Besant, “Prologue: Who is Edmund Gray?”, in The Ivory Gate [], New York, N.Y.: Harper & Brothers, [], OCLC 16832619, page 16:
      Athelstan Arundel walked home all the way, foaming and raging. No omnibus, cab, or conveyance ever built could contain a young man in such a rage. His mother lived at Pembridge Square, which is four good measured miles from Lincoln's Inn.
    • 1918, W. B. Maxwell, chapter 10, in The Mirror and the Lamp:
      It was a joy to snatch some brief respite, and find himself in the rectory drawing–room. Listening here was as pleasant as talking; just to watch was pleasant. The young priests who lived here wore cassocks and birettas; their faces were fine and mild, yet really strong, like the rector's face; and in their intercourse with him and his wife they seemed to be brothers.
    1. (intransitive, informal) (of an object) to have its proper place; to normally be stored.
      I washed your gravy boat. Where does it live?
  3. (intransitive) To survive; to persevere; to continue.
    Her memory lives in that song.
    • 2017 March 14, Stuart James, “Leicester stun Sevilla to reach last eight after Kasper Schmeichel save”, in the Guardian[1]:
      He has now overseen three straight victories since taking over from Claudio Ranieri and this latest win, against one of the best teams in Europe, will live long in the memory for every Leicester supporter.
  4. (intransitive, hyperbolic) To cope.
    You'll just have to live with it!  I can't live in a world without you.
  5. (intransitive) To pass life in a specified manner.
    It is difficult to live in poverty.   And they lived happily ever after.
  6. (transitive) To spend, as one's life; to pass; to maintain; to continue in, constantly or habitually.
    To live an idle or a useful life.
    • 1921, Juanita Helm Floyd, Women in the Life of Balzac:
      Many people write their romances, others live them; Honore de Balzac did both.
    • 2011 December 19, Kerry Brown, “Kim Jong-il obituary”, in The Guardian:
      By 1980, South Korea had overtaken its northern neighbour, and was well on its way to being one of the Asian tigers – high-performing economies, with democratic movements ultimately winning power in the 1990s. The withdrawal of most Soviet aid in 1991, with the fall of the Soviet empire, pushed North Korea further down. Kim Il-sung had held a genuine place on North Korean people's affections. His son was regarded as a shadowy playboy, with rumours circulating over the years that he imported Russian and Chinese prostitutes, and lived a life of profligacy and excess.
    • 2013 June 1, “Towards the end of poverty”, in The Economist, volume 407, number 8838, page 11:
      But poverty’s scourge is fiercest below $1.25 (the average of the 15 poorest countries’ own poverty lines, measured in 2005 dollars and adjusted for differences in purchasing power): people below that level live lives that are poor, nasty, brutish and short.
  7. (transitive) To act habitually in conformity with; to practice; to exemplify in one's way of life.
  8. (intransitive) To outlast danger; to float (said of a ship, boat, etc).
    No ship could live in such a storm.
  9. (intransitive, followed by "on" or "upon") To maintain or support one's existence; to provide for oneself; to feed; to subsist.
    It is hard to live on the minimum wage.   They lived on stale bread.
  10. (intransitive, informal) To make the most of life; to experience a full, rich life.
    I'm sick of spending every day studying at home: I want to go out there and live!
SynonymsEdit
Usage notesEdit

Throughout Late Middle English and Early Modern English in Midlands and Northern dialects, the present participle form livand co-occurs with the form living.

Derived termsEdit
Related termsEdit
Terms related to live (verb)
TranslationsEdit
The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Wiktionary:Entry layout § Translations.

See alsoEdit

Etymology 2Edit

An aphetic form of alive.

PronunciationEdit

AdjectiveEdit

live (not comparable)

  1. (only used attributively) Having life; that is alive.
    The post office will not ship live animals.
  2. Being in existence; actual
    He is a live example of the consequences of excessive drinking.
  3. Having active properties; being energized.
    Because the vaccinia virus is live, it is important to follow care instructions for the vaccination site.
  4. Operational; in actual use rather than in testing etc.
    1. (programming) Of an object or value: that may potentially be used in the future execution of a program.
      • Antonym: dead
      • 1996, Richard Jones; Rafael Lins, Garbage Collection, →ISBN, page 4:
        An object in the heap is live if its address is held in a root, or there is a pointer to it held in another live heap node.
  5. Taken from a living animal.
    live feathers
  6. (engineering) Imparting power; having motion.
    the live spindle of a lathe
    a live, or driving, axle
  7. (sports) Still in active play.
    a live ball
  8. (card games) Of a card: not yet dealt or played.
    • 2005, Alison M. Pendergast, Play Winning Poker in No Time (page 57)
      As a beginner, when you are in a hand, you should practice counting your outs, or those live cards left in the deck that can improve your hand.
  9. (broadcasting) Being broadcast (“on the air”), as it happens.
    The station presented a live news program every evening.
    Are we live?
  10. (of a performance or speech) In person.
    This nightclub has a live band on weekends.
  11. (entertainment, performing) Recorded from a performance in front of an audience.
    a live album
  12. Of firearms or explosives, capable of causing harm.
    The air force practices dropping live bombs on the uninhabited island.
  13. (circuitry) Electrically charged or energized, usually indicating that the item may cause electrocution if touched.
    Use caution when working near live wires.
  14. (poker) Being a bet which can be raised by the bettor, usually in reference to a blind or straddle.
    Tommy's blind was live, so he was given the option to raise.
  15. Featuring humans; not animated, in the phrases “live actors” or “live action”.
  16. Being in a state of ignition; burning.
    a live coal; live embers
  17. (obsolete, slang, of a person) Full of earnestness; active; wide awake; glowing.
    a live man, or orator
    • 1916 March 25, Irvin S. Cobb, “Unaccustomed as I am—”, in Saturday Evening Post[2]:
      Call it a dead language if you want to—it looks to me like those Latinites were the live boys when it came to putting a whole lot of meaning into just two or three words.
  18. (obsolete) Vivid; bright.
Usage notesEdit
  • Live in the sense of "having life" is used only attributively (before a noun), as in "live animals". Predicatively (after the noun), alive is used, as in "be alive". Living may be used either attributively or predicatively.
SynonymsEdit
AntonymsEdit
Derived termsEdit
CompoundsEdit
TranslationsEdit
The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Wiktionary:Entry layout § Translations.

AdverbEdit

live (comparative more live, superlative most live)

  1. Of an event, as it happens; in real time; direct.
    The concert was broadcast live by radio.
  2. Of making a performance or speech, in person.
    He'll be appearing live at the auditorium.
TranslationsEdit

Further readingEdit

AnagramsEdit


DanishEdit

Etymology 1Edit

Verbal form of the noun liv (life).

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /liːvə/, [ˈliːʊ̯ə], [ˈliːʊ]

VerbEdit

live (imperative liv, infinitive at live, present tense liver, past tense livede, perfect tense har livet)

  1. enliven
Usage notesEdit

Used with op (up): live op

Etymology 2Edit

Borrowed from English live [1965].

AdverbEdit

live

  1. live (as it happens)
SynonymsEdit

EsperantoEdit

EtymologyEdit

From liva +‎ -e.

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): [ˈlive]
  • Hyphenation: li‧ve
  • Rhymes: -ive

AdverbEdit

live (lative liven)

  1. (neologism) on the left

SynonymsEdit

AntonymsEdit

Related termsEdit


FinnishEdit

Etymology 1Edit

lipeä +‎ -e

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /ˈliʋeˣ/, [ˈliʋe̞(ʔ)]
  • Rhymes: -iʋe
  • Syllabification: li‧ve

NounEdit

live

  1. (dialectal) lye
DeclensionEdit
Inflection of live (Kotus type 48/hame, p-v gradation)
nominative live lipeet
genitive lipeen lipeiden
lipeitten
partitive livettä lipeitä
illative lipeeseen lipeisiin
lipeihin
singular plural
nominative live lipeet
accusative nom. live lipeet
gen. lipeen
genitive lipeen lipeiden
lipeitten
partitive livettä lipeitä
inessive lipeessä lipeissä
elative lipeestä lipeistä
illative lipeeseen lipeisiin
lipeihin
adessive lipeellä lipeillä
ablative lipeeltä lipeiltä
allative lipeelle lipeille
essive lipeenä lipeinä
translative lipeeksi lipeiksi
instructive lipein
abessive lipeettä lipeittä
comitative lipeineen
Possessive forms of live (type hame)
possessor singular plural
1st person lipeeni lipeemme
2nd person lipeesi lipeenne
3rd person lipeensä
SynonymsEdit

Etymology 2Edit

From English live.

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /ˈliʋe/, [ˈliʋe̞]
  • Rhymes: -iʋe
  • Syllabification: li‧ve

AdjectiveEdit

live (not comparable)

  1. (nonstandard) live
Usage notesEdit
  • Chiefly used as modifier in compound terms:
    live-esitys
    live performance
  • Almost always used in essive singular when used independently:
    He esiintyvät tänään livenä areenalla.
    They will perform live today at the arena.

SynonymsEdit

AnagramsEdit


FrenchEdit

PronunciationEdit

AdjectiveEdit

live

  1. recorded at a concert as opposed to in a studio
  2. in real time

SynonymsEdit

NounEdit

live m (plural live)

  1. live stream, a video broadcast in real time, a Q&A (even written) in real time
    comment faire un live sur YouTube - how to do a livestream on YouTube
    Le Monde a fait un live pendant le confinement. - Le Monde did a live Q&A during the lockdown.

Derived termsEdit


GermanEdit

EtymologyEdit

From English live.

PronunciationEdit

AdverbEdit

live

  1. (broadcast, event) live (at it happens, in real time, directly)

Usage notesEdit

  • There is no adjective corresponding to live, but it can form compounds (see below).

SynonymsEdit

Derived termsEdit

Further readingEdit

  • live” in Duden online

ItalianEdit

PronunciationEdit

AdjectiveEdit

live (invariable)

  1. performed or recorded live

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ live in Luciano Canepari, Dizionario di Pronuncia Italiana (DiPI)

AnagramsEdit


LatinEdit

VerbEdit

līvē

  1. second-person singular present active imperative of līveō

Middle EnglishEdit

VerbEdit

live

  1. Alternative form of lyven

Norwegian NynorskEdit

Etymology 1Edit

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

live n

  1. dative singular of liv
Usage notesEdit

Etymology 2Edit

Borrowed from English live.

PronunciationEdit

AdjectiveEdit

live (singular and plural live)

  1. live (some technical senses)
    1. (broadcasting) on air
    2. (of a performance or speech) in person
    3. (entertainment, performing) recorded in front of a live audience

Etymology 3Edit

From Old Norse hlífa, from Proto-Germanic *hlībijaną. The noun is derived from the verb.

PronunciationEdit

VerbEdit

live (present tense liver, past tense livde, past participle livd/livt, passive infinitive livast, present participle livande, imperative liv)

  1. (transitive) to shelter, protect, especially from the weather and elements
Alternative formsEdit
Related termsEdit

NounEdit

live n (definite singular livet, uncountable)

  1. (rare) shelter, cover, protection, especially from the elements
    Synonyms: le, livd, ly

Etymology 4Edit

Of the noun liv n (life).

PronunciationEdit

VerbEdit

live (present tense livar, past tense liva, past participle liva, passive infinitive livast, present participle livande, imperative liv)

  1. (transitive, intransitive) to liven
Alternative formsEdit
Derived termsEdit

ReferencesEdit

AnagramsEdit


PicardEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin liber.

NounEdit

live m (plural lives)

  1. book

SwaziEdit

NounEdit

líve 5 (plural émáve 6)

  1. country

InflectionEdit

This noun needs an inflection-table template.