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EnglishEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From English dialectal wanky, alteration of Middle English wankel (unstable, shaky), from Old English wancol (unstable), from Proto-Germanic *wankulaz (swaying, shaky, unstable).

PronunciationEdit

  • (UK) IPA(key): /ˈwɔːŋ.kɪ/
  • (US) enPR: wŏngʹkē, IPA(key): /ˈwɑŋ.ki/, /ˈwɔŋ.ki/
  • (file)
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  • Rhymes: -ɒŋki

AdjectiveEdit

wonky (comparative wonkier, superlative wonkiest)

  1. Lopsided, misaligned or off-centre.
    Synonyms: awry, lonkie, misaligned, skew-whiff
  2. (chiefly Britain, Australia, New Zealand) Feeble, shaky or rickety.
    Synonym: rickety
    • 1932, Frank Richards, The Magnet: The Terror of the Form
      It seemed likely that he would need First Aid when those wonky steps yielded, at length, to the well-known law of gravitation.
  3. (informal, computing, especially Usenet) Suffering from intermittent bugs.
    Synonyms: buggy, broken
  4. (informal) Generally incorrect.
Derived termsEdit

NounEdit

wonky (uncountable)

  1. (music) A subgenre of electronic music employing unstable rhythms, complex time signatures, and mid-range synths.
    • 2015, Jan Kyrre Berg O. Friis, ‎Robert P. Crease, Technoscience and Postphenomenology: The Manhattan Papers
      By the late 2000s, dubstep had splintered into numerous factions, from brostep to wonky to the evocative “purple,” []

Etymology 2Edit

wonk +‎ -y

AdjectiveEdit

wonky (comparative wonkier, superlative wonkiest)

  1. Technically worded, in the style of jargon.

AnagramsEdit