See also: Yate

EnglishEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Middle English ȝate, yate, ȝeat, alternative forms of gate, gat, from Old English ġeat (a gate, door), from Proto-Germanic *gatą (hole, opening).

NounEdit

yate (plural yates)

  1. Obsolete form of gate.
    • c. 1420, Hoccleve, Thomas, Dialogue:
      Syn he of helthe hath opned me the yate
    • 1579, Spenser, Edmund, “May”, in The Shepheardes Calender; republished as The Works of that Famous English Poet, Mr. Edmond Spenser, London: Henry Hills, 1679, page 21:
      For thy my Kiddie, be ruled by me, / And never give trust to his trechery: / And if he chance come when I am abroad, / Spar the yate fast, for fear of fraud.
    • 1847, Brontë, Emily, Wuthering Heights, London: Smith, Elder & Co., published 1870, page 69:
      He's left th' yate at t' full swing, and Miss's pony has trodden dahn two rigs o' corn , and plottered through, raight o'er into t' meadow!

Etymology 2Edit

Unknown

NounEdit

yate (plural yates)

  1. Any of several species of Eucalyptus.

AnagramsEdit


Bikol CentralEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from Spanish yate (yacht).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

yate

  1. yacht

Derived termsEdit


CebuanoEdit

PronunciationEdit

  • Hyphenation: ya‧te

NounEdit

yate

  1. a yacht; a slick and light ship for making pleasure trips or racing on water, having sails but often motor-powered

QuotationsEdit

For quotations using this term, see Citations:yate.


FijianEdit

EtymologyEdit

From ate, from Proto-Central-Pacific *qate, from Proto-Oceanic *qate, from Proto-Eastern Malayo-Polynesian *qatay, from Proto-Central-Eastern Malayo-Polynesian *qatay, from Proto-Malayo-Polynesian *qatay, from Proto-Austronesian *qaCay.

NounEdit

yate

  1. (anatomy) liver (organ of the body)

Middle EnglishEdit

NounEdit

yate (plural yatis)

  1. Alternative form of gate (gate)

SpanishEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from English yacht, from Dutch jacht.

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /ˈɟ͡ʝate/, [ˈɟ͡ʝat̪e]

NounEdit

yate m (plural yates)

  1. yacht

TagalogEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from Spanish yate (yacht).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

yate

  1. yacht

Derived termsEdit