See also: Até, Atë, até, atè, atê, atë, āte, åte, -ate, and átʼé

EnglishEdit

Alternative formsEdit

  • et (informal pronunciation spelling)

PronunciationEdit

VerbEdit

ate

  1. simple past tense of eat
  2. (colloquial, nonstandard) past participle of eat
    • 1805, Maximilien de Béthune duc de Sully, Memoirs of Maximillian de Bethune, Duke of Sully, Prime Minister of Henry the Great [] [1], volume IV, page 171:
      I have a very good appetite, have ate some excellent melons, and they have served me up some quails, the fattest and tenderest I have ever ate.
    • 1929, Sir Arthur Thomas Quiller-Couch, Nicky-Nan, Reservist[2], page 27:
      “Haven't ate all the eggs, I hope? For I be hungry as a hunter []
    • 2013 January 11 [1997], David Bell; Gill Valentine, Consuming Geographies: We Are Where We Eat[3], Routledge, →ISBN, page 140:
      So I'd have ate when me Dad had ate, sort of thing, I think, you know when he come home from work, I'd have waited for him, I wouldn't have said I wanted mine at four o'clock []

AnagramsEdit


AsturianEdit

VerbEdit

ate

  1. first-person singular present subjunctive of atar
  2. third-person singular present subjunctive of atar

BasqueEdit

 
Basque Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia eu
 
atea

EtymologyEdit

Unknown.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

ate inan

  1. door, entrance
  2. defile, gorge (deep, narrow passage)
  3. (sports) goal (structure)
  4. exterior, outside part

DeclensionEdit

Declension of ate (inanimate, ending in vowel)
indefinite singular plural
absolutive ate atea ateak
ergative atek ateak ateek
dative ateri ateari ateei
genitive ateren atearen ateen
comitative aterekin atearekin ateekin
causative aterengatik atearengatik ateengatik
benefactive aterentzat atearentzat ateentzat
instrumental atez ateaz ateez
inessive atetan atean ateetan
locative atetako ateko ateetako
allative atetara atera ateetara
terminative atetaraino ateraino ateetaraino
directive atetarantz aterantz ateetarantz
destinative atetarako aterako ateetarako
ablative atetatik atetik ateetatik
partitive aterik
prolative atetzat

Derived termsEdit

Further readingEdit

  • ate” in Euskaltzaindiaren Hiztegia, euskaltzaindia.eus
  • ate” in Orotariko Euskal Hiztegia, euskaltzaindia.eus

DrehuEdit

PronunciationEdit

VerbEdit

ate

  1. to know, be knowledgable

ReferencesEdit


DutchEdit

PronunciationEdit

VerbEdit

ate

  1. (archaic) singular past subjunctive of eten

FijianEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-Central-Pacific *qate, from Proto-Oceanic *qate, from Proto-Eastern Malayo-Polynesian *qatay, from Proto-Central-Eastern Malayo-Polynesian *qatay, from Proto-Malayo-Polynesian *qatay, from Proto-Austronesian *qaCay.

NounEdit

ate

  1. Obsolete spelling of yate

JapaneseEdit

RomanizationEdit

ate

  1. Rōmaji transcription of あて

KapampanganEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-Philippine [Term?], from Proto-Malayo-Polynesian *qatay, from Proto-Austronesian *qaCay.

NounEdit

até

  1. (anatomy) liver

LaboyaEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-Malayo-Polynesian *qatay, from Proto-Austronesian *qaCay.

NounEdit

ate

  1. (anatomy) liver
  2. (figuratively) heart

Derived termsEdit

ReferencesEdit

  • Rina, A. Dj.; Kabba, John Lado B. (2011), “ate”, in Kamus Bahasa Lamboya, Kabupaten Sumba Bakat [Dictionary of Lamboya Language, West Sumba Regency], Waikabubak: Dinas Kebudayaan dan Pariwisata, Kabupaten Sumba Bakat, page 6
  • Laboya in Austronesian Comparative Dictionary

LinduEdit

NounEdit

ate

  1. (anatomy) liver

LithuanianEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

Etymology unclear. Compare Latvian atā.[1] The word may not be very old, and may ultimately derive from French adieu, via a Slavic intermediary.[2]

InterjectionEdit

ate

  1. (informal) goodbye, ta-ta
    Synonyms: iki, viso gero

Usage notesEdit

The interjection was originally restricted to childish language, but it is now used more generally in colloquial speech.[1] The VLKK recommends against using it in official communication.[2]

ReferencesEdit

  1. 1.0 1.1 Rita Miliūnaitė (2010), “Atia ar ate?”, in kalbosnamai.lt, LKI
  2. 2.0 2.1 atia, ate”, in Konsultacijų bankas [Consultation bank], Valstybinė lietuvių kalbos komisija [Commission on the Lithuanian language], 2003–2022

MandinkaEdit

PronounEdit

ate

  1. he, him (personal pronoun)
  2. she, her (personal pronoun)
  3. it (personal pronoun)

See alsoEdit


MaoriEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-Polynesian *qate, from Proto-Oceanic *qate, from Proto-Eastern Malayo-Polynesian *qatay, from Proto-Central-Eastern Malayo-Polynesian *qatay, from Proto-Malayo-Polynesian *qatay, from Proto-Austronesian *qaCay.

NounEdit

ate

  1. (anatomy) liver (organ of the body)

Middle EnglishEdit

NounEdit

ate

  1. Alternative form of ote

Mori BawahEdit

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

ate

  1. liver

ReferencesEdit

  • The Austronesian Languages of Asia and Madagascar (2013, →ISBN, page 684

NiasEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-Malayo-Polynesian *qatay, from Proto-Austronesian *qaCay.

NounEdit

ate (mutated form gate)

  1. liver

ReferencesEdit

  • Sundermann, Heinrich. 1905. Niassisch-deutsches Wörterbuch. Moers: Bataviaasch Genootschap van Kunsten en Wetenschappen, p. 21.

OjibweEdit

VerbEdit

ate (changed conjunct form eteg, reduplicated form ayate, augmented form atemagad)

  1. be (in a certain place)
    Gii-kwanabise iwe biskitenaagan imaa adoopowinaakong gaa-ateg.
    The birch bark tray that was sitting on the table tipped over.

ConjugationEdit

See alsoEdit

ReferencesEdit


PortugueseEdit

VerbEdit

ate

  1. first-person singular (eu) present subjunctive of atar
  2. third-person singular (ele and ela, also used with você and others) present subjunctive of atar
  3. third-person singular (você) affirmative imperative of atar
  4. third-person singular (você) negative imperative of atar

SahuEdit

EtymologyEdit

Cognate with Ternate hate.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

ate

  1. tree

ReferencesEdit

  • Leontine Visser, Clemens Voorhoeve (1987) Sahu-Indonesian-English Dictionary, Brill

ScotsEdit

NounEdit

ate (plural ates)

  1. Alternative form of ait (oat)

ReferencesEdit


SpanishEdit

PronunciationEdit

Etymology 1Edit

Of Nahuatl origin.

NounEdit

ate m (plural ates)

  1. a kind of Mexican jelly candy made by cooking fruit pulp, usually from guava, quince, peach or prickly pear
    Synonym: dulce

Etymology 2Edit

See the etymology of the corresponding lemma form.

VerbEdit

ate

  1. inflection of atar:
    1. first-person singular present subjunctive
    2. third-person singular present subjunctive
    3. third-person singular imperative

Further readingEdit


TagalogEdit

Etymology 1Edit

Borrowed from Hokkien 阿姊 (a-chí, elder sister). Doublet of atsi. May also be from Sanskrit अत्ति (atti, elder sister) but the Chinese origin is more probable.

Alternative formsEdit

PronunciationEdit

  • Hyphenation: a‧te
  • IPA(key): /ˈʔate/
  • IPA(key): /ʔaˈte/, [ʔɐˈte] (rare)

NounEdit

ate

  1. elder sister; big sister
    Nagluto sina ate at nanay ng pananghalian namin.Our big sister and mother cooked our lunch.
  2. (informal) term of address for a female senior (in school, work, etc.)
    Tinanong ko si ate sa hayskul, "Ate, ano po ang mga gawain niyo sa hayskul".I asked my senior from high school, "Miss, what activities do you do in high school?"
  3. (informal) term of address for any young female: miss; sis
    Synonym: (slightly older) manang
    Bumili ako ng pagkain kay ate.I bought food from the miss.
Coordinate termsEdit
Related termsEdit

Etymology 2Edit

PronunciationEdit

  • Hyphenation: a‧te
  • IPA(key): /ʔaˈteʔ/, [ʔɐˈteʔ]

NounEdit

atê

  1. (childish) dirt
    Synonyms: atse, tsetse, aa

TernateEdit

PronunciationEdit

VerbEdit

ate

  1. (intransitive) to connect

ConjugationEdit

Conjugation of ate
Singular Plural
Inclusive Exclusive
1st toate foate miate
2nd noate niate
3rd Human oatem, moatef iate, yoate
Non-human iate iate, yoate
* m - masculine, f - feminine, - archaic

ReferencesEdit

  • Rika Hayami-Allen (2001) A descriptive study of the language of Ternate, the northern Moluccas, Indonesia, University of Pittsburgh

Tocharian BEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

Probably from Proto-Tocharian *āté, from Proto-Indo-European *éti.

AdverbEdit

ate

  1. away

Further readingEdit

  • Adams, Douglas Q. (2013), “ate”, in A Dictionary of Tocharian B: Revised and Greatly Enlarged (Leiden Studies in Indo-European; 10), Amsterdam, New York: Rodopi, →ISBN, page 10

WaujaEdit

PronunciationEdit

InterjectionEdit

ate

  1. ow, ouch (expressing pain in response to heat)
    Ate! Inyatapai itsei!Ow! [The] fire is hot! [I got singed or burned].

ReferencesEdit

  • E. Ireland field notes. Need to be checked by native speaker.