See also: Gat, gát, gât, gắt, -gat, and гать

English edit

Pronunciation edit

  • IPA(key): /ɡæt/
  • (file)
  • Rhymes: -æt

Etymology 1 edit

From Gatling gun, after inventor Richard Gatling.

Noun edit

gat (plural gats)

  1. (archaic, slang, in old westerns) A Gatling gun.
  2. (originally 1920s gangster slang) Any type of gun, usually a pistol.
    Synonyms: piece; see also Thesaurus:firearm
    • 1939, Raymond Chandler, The Big Sleep:
      You're the second guy I've met within hours who seems to think a gat in the hand means a world by the tail.
    • 1988, N.W.A, Straight Outta Compton:
      Goin' off on a motherfucker like that
      With a gat that's pointed at yo ass
    • 1992, “A Nigga Witta Gun”, in The Chronic, performed by Dr. Dre, Death Row Records:
      It'll make you drop to your knees 'cause you realize, that a gat'll make any nigga civilized.
    • 1994, 1:45 from the start, in Juicy[1] (Hip Hop), spoken by The Notorious B.I.G.:
      I never thought it could happen, this rappin' stuff
      I was too used to packin' gats and stuff
    • 2006, Noire [pseudonym], Thug-A-Licious: An Urban Erotic Tale, New York, N.Y.: One World, Ballantine Books, →ISBN, page 115:
      Pimp pulled out his gat and let it hang in his hand. His message was clear.
Translations edit

Verb edit

gat (third-person singular simple present gats, present participle gatting, simple past and past participle gatted)

  1. (slang) To shoot someone with a pistol or other handheld firearm.
    • 2000, George Nelson, One Woman Short, page 27:
      He in a black suit in a coffin, gatted by a junkie for his fake Rolex watch at a taco stand on Western.
    • 2002, Brian A. Massey, Shadow Clock, page 293:
      Vance's death scene would have a racy romantic glamour, sort of like Dillinger gatted at the Biograph, Pretty Boy slain in the cornfield, Bonnie and Clyde ambushed in their Ford Roadster.
    • 2005, Lewis Grossberger, Turn that down!, page 198:
      Fact I was chillin' with Notorious BIG when he got gatted. It was a[sic] accident. Biggie got in front of my Glock when I was bustin' slugs at some mothaf***a.

Etymology 2 edit

From guitar, by shortening.

Noun edit

gat (plural gats)

  1. (New Zealand, slang) A guitar

Etymology 3 edit

Verb edit

gat

  1. (Scotland and Northern England or archaic) simple past of get

Etymology 4 edit

From Icelandic gat.

Noun edit

gat (plural gats)

  1. An opening between sandbanks; a strait.

Etymology 5 edit

 
English Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia

From Korean (gat).

Alternative forms edit

Noun edit

gat (plural gats)

  1. A traditional Korean hat made of horsehair, once worn by married gentlemen.

See also edit

Anagrams edit

Afrikaans edit

Etymology edit

From Dutch gat (hole, gap; arse), from Middle Dutch gat, from Old Dutch *gat, from Proto-Germanic *gatą.

Pronunciation edit

Noun edit

gat (plural gate, diminutive gaatjie)

  1. hole; perforation
  2. gap; opening
    Hy't 'n gat in sy opvoeding.
    He has a gap in his education.
  3. hole or hollowed out area used as a shelter or home by animals
  4. (figuratively) dump; a run-down living space, room or house
    Jinne! Jy bly in 'n gat!
    Man! You live in a dump!
  5. (golf) hole; cup

Synonyms edit

Derived terms edit

Noun edit

gat (plural gatte, diminutive gatjie)

  1. (vulgar) anus
  2. (crude) rump; buttocks; bum; ass; backside of a human
    Sit op jou gat!
    Sit on your ass!
  3. the backside of animals or objects
    Die olifant staan met sy gat na ons toe.
    The elephant is standing with his backside turned to us.

Synonyms edit

Derived terms edit

Anagrams edit

Catalan edit

Etymology edit

Inherited from Old Catalan gat, from Late Latin cattus (cat). Compare Occitan gat~cat, French chat, Spanish gato.

Pronunciation edit

Noun edit

gat m (plural gats, feminine gata)

  1. cat (feline animal)
  2. jack (device for lifting heavy objects)
  3. A catshark, especially the small-spotted catshark.

Synonyms edit

  • (cat): mix (colloquial), moix (colloquial)
  • (small-spotted catshark): gat ver

Derived terms edit

Related terms edit

Adjective edit

gat (feminine gata, masculine plural gats, feminine plural gates)

  1. (Mallorca) drunk

References edit

Danish edit

Etymology edit

From Old Norse gat, from Proto-Germanic *gatą.

Pronunciation edit

Noun edit

gat (singular definite gattet, plural indefinite gatter)

  1. (zoology) anus (of an animal, fish especially)
  2. (nautical) scupper

Dutch edit

Etymology edit

From Middle Dutch gat, from Old Dutch *gat, from Proto-West Germanic *gat, from Proto-Germanic *gatą. Doublet of gate.

Pronunciation edit

Noun edit

gat n (plural gaten, diminutive gaatje n)

  1. gap, hole
    Synonyms: hol, opening
    Het kind viel door een gat in de omheining.
    The child fell through a gap in the fence.
    Er zit een groot gat in de muur na het verwijderen van het schilderij.
    There is a big hole in the wall after removing the painting.
    Het lek in het dak veroorzaakte een gat waar het water naar binnen stroomde.
    The leak in the roof caused a gap where the water flowed in.
  2. godforsaken place, hamlet
    Synonyms: uithoek, midden van nergens
  3. (archaic) port

Descendants edit

  • Afrikaans: gat

Derived terms edit

Descendants edit

Noun edit

gat n or m (plural gatten or gaten, diminutive gatje n or gaatje n)

  1. (vulgar) arsehole
  2. (by extension, informal) the buttocks, butt, bum, rear-end, bottom of a person or animal
    • "Het regent" (nursery rhyme).
      Het regent, het regent, / de pannetjes worden nat. / Er kwamen twee soldaatjes aan, / die vielen op hun gat.
      It's raining, it's raining, / the roof tiles are getting wet. / Two soldiers were coming near, / who fell on their buttocks.
      1931, Antoon Coolen, De goede moordenaar[2]:
      Dan vat hij het klein jongske van de grond en zet het op zijn gatje op het grote paard.
      Then he picks up the little boy from the ground and puts him on his ass on the big horse.
    Synonyms: achterste, kont, (vulgar) reet

Derived terms edit

Icelandic edit

Pronunciation edit

Etymology 1 edit

From Old Norse gat, from Proto-Germanic *gatą.

Noun edit

gat n (genitive singular gats, nominative plural göt)

  1. hole, perforation (an opening through a solid body)
    Hann notaði skóna þangað til komið var gat á þá.
    He used the shoes until they had got a hole in them.
  2. (colloquial, school) a gap in a fixed schedule, an unassigned time in the schedule, usually between classes; break, free period
    Ég er í gati milli níu og hálfellefu á fimmtudögum.
    I have a break between nine and half past ten on Thursdays.
Declension edit
Derived terms edit

Etymology 2 edit

See the etymology of the corresponding lemma form.

Verb edit

gat

  1. first-person singular active present indicative of geta
    Ég gat ekki stöðvað hana.
    I couldn't stop her.
  2. third-person singular active present indicative of geta

See also edit

Lombard edit

Alternative forms edit

Etymology edit

From Latin cattus ("cat"), cognate to Ligurian Italian gatto, Catalan and Piedmontese gat, Spanish gato.

Pronunciation edit

  • IPA(key): /ɡat/
    • IPA(key): [ɡat] (Western, Eastern)
    • IPA(key): [ɡat], [ɡɛt], [ɟɛt] (Ticinese)

Noun edit

gat m (masculine plural gatj, feminine singular gata, feminine plural gate)

  1. cat

Lower Sorbian edit

Etymology edit

From Proto-Slavic *gatь (dike). Cognate with Upper Sorbian hat, Polish gać, Serbo-Croatian gat (ditch, dam).

Pronunciation edit

Noun edit

gat m inan (diminutive gaśik)

  1. pond
  2. dam, embankment

Declension edit

Derived terms edit

Further reading edit

  • Muka, Arnošt (1921, 1928) “gat”, in Słownik dolnoserbskeje rěcy a jeje narěcow (in German), St. Petersburg, Prague: ОРЯС РАН, ČAVU; Reprinted Bautzen: Domowina-Verlag, 2008
  • Starosta, Manfred (1999) “gat”, in Dolnoserbsko-nimski słownik / Niedersorbisch-deutsches Wörterbuch (in German), Bautzen: Domowina-Verlag

Mauritian Creole edit

Pronunciation edit

Verb edit

gat

  1. Medial form of gate

Middle English edit

Etymology 1 edit

Noun edit

gat

  1. Alternative form of gate (gate)

Etymology 2 edit

Noun edit

gat

  1. Alternative form of gate (way)

Etymology 3 edit

Noun edit

gat

  1. (Northern, Early Middle English) Alternative form of goot

Norwegian Nynorsk edit

Etymology 1 edit

Verb edit

gat

  1. past tense of gjeta

Etymology 2 edit

Noun edit

gat n (definite singular gatet, indefinite plural gat, definite plural gata or gati)

  1. (pre-2012) alternative form of gatt

Nuer edit

Pronunciation edit

Noun edit

gat

  1. son

Occitan edit

Alternative forms edit

Etymology edit

From Old Occitan, from Late Latin cattus (compare Catalan gat, French chat). See cat for more.

Pronunciation edit

Noun edit

gat m (plural gats, feminine gata, feminine plural gatas)

  1. a cat

Related terms edit

Old English edit

 
Wīflīcu gāt and twā tiċċenu

Etymology edit

From Proto-Germanic *gaits. Cognate with Old Frisian *gāt, Old Saxon gēt, Old Dutch *geit, Old High German geiz, Old Norse geit, Gothic 𐌲𐌰𐌹𐍄𐍃 (gaits); and with Latin haedus (kid).

Pronunciation edit

Noun edit

gāt f

  1. goat

Declension edit

Hyponyms edit

Derived terms edit

Descendants edit

Old Norse edit

Etymology 1 edit

Inherited from Proto-Germanic *gatą

Noun edit

gat n

  1. hole, opening
Descendants edit
  • Norwegian Nynorsk: gatt

Etymology 2 edit

Verb edit

gat

  1. first/third-person singular past indicative active of geta

References edit

  • gat”, in Geir T. Zoëga (1910) A Concise Dictionary of Old Icelandic, Oxford: Clarendon Press

Romagnol edit

Etymology edit

 
E’ gat

From Late Latin cattus (cat). See the etymology at cat for further details.

Pronunciation edit

  • IPA(key): /ˈɡat/, [ˈɡaɐ̯t]

Noun edit

gat m (plural ghët)

  1. cat (Felis silvestris catus, a domesticated feline commonly kept as a house pet)
    • December 2007, Vincenzo Sanchini, Tigrin e Biancon in la Ludla, il Papiro, page 8:
      S'i padrùn gio tla pianura,\ chi por gat j è armast te' ghét,\ in s'è mòs da meda tl'éra,\ a raspè mla porta tchjusa.

Romanian edit

Etymology edit

Borrowed from Hungarian gát, from Proto-Slavic *gatь.

Noun edit

gat n (plural gaturi)

  1. (Transylvania) dam

Declension edit

Romansch edit

Alternative forms edit

Etymology edit

From Late Latin cattus.

Noun edit

gat m (plural gats)

  1. (Sursilvan, Sutsilvan) cat

Serbo-Croatian edit

Etymology edit

Inherited from Proto-Slavic *gatь (dike). Cognate with Slovak hať (dam), Upper Sorbian hat, Polish gać, Lower Sorbian gat (pond, dam), and Russian гать (gatʹ, causeway).

Pronunciation edit

Noun edit

gȁt m (Cyrillic spelling га̏т)

  1. ditch
  2. dam

Declension edit

Further reading edit

  • gat” in Hrvatski jezični portal

Tagalog edit

Noun edit

gat (Baybayin spelling ᜄᜆ᜔)

  1. Alternative letter-case form of Gat

Further reading edit

  • gat”, in Pambansang Diksiyonaryo | Diksiyonaryo.ph, Manila, 2018

Tok Pisin edit

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Alternative forms edit

Etymology edit

From English got.

Verb edit

gat

  1. have
    • 1989, Buk Baibel long Tok Pisin, Port Moresby: Bible Society of Papua New Guinea, Jenesis 1:20:
      Bihain God i tok olsem, “Solwara i mas pulap long ol kain kain samting i gat laip. Na ol pisin i mas kamap na flai nabaut long skai.”
      →New International Version translation

Derived terms edit

Venetian edit

Alternative forms edit

Etymology edit

Compare Venetian gato and Italian gatto.

Pronunciation edit

  • IPA(key): /ˈɡat/
  • Hyphenation: gàt

Noun edit

gat m (plural gati)

  1. (Belluno, Northern Treviso, Chipilo) cat