See also: gát, gắt, gât, and Gat

EnglishEdit

PronunciationEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Gatling gun, after inventor Richard Gatling.

NounEdit

gat (plural gats)

  1. (archaic, slang, in old westerns) A Gatling gun.
  2. (slang, 1920's gangster) Any type of gun; usually in reference to a pistol.
TranslationsEdit

VerbEdit

gat (third-person singular simple present gats, present participle gatting, simple past and past participle gatted)

  1. (slang) To shoot someone with a pistol or other handheld firearm.
    • 2000, George Nelson, One Woman Short, page 27:
      He in a black suit in a coffin, gatted by a junkie for his fake Rolex watch at a taco stand on Western.
    • 2002, Brian A. Massey, Shadow Clock‎, page 293:
      Vance's death scene would have a racy romantic glamour, sort of like Dillinger gatted at the Biograph, Pretty Boy slain in the cornfield, Bonnie and Clyde ambushed in their Ford Roadster.
    • 2005, Lewis Grossberger, Turn that down!, page 198:
      Fact I was chillin' with Notorious BIG when he got gatted. It was a accident. Biggie got in front of my Glock when I was bustin' slugs at some mothaf***a.

Etymology 2Edit

From guitar, by shortening

NounEdit

gat (plural gats)

  1. (New Zealand, slang) A guitar

Etymology 3Edit

VerbEdit

gat

  1. (Scottish and Northern English, or archaic) simple past tense of get
    And Abraham gat up early in the morning (Genesis 1927)

AnagramsEdit


AfrikaansEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Dutch gat (hole).

NounEdit

gat (plural gate, diminutive gaatjie)

  1. hole; perforation
  2. gap; opening
    Hy't 'n gat in sy opvoeding.
    He has a gap in his education.
  3. hole or hollowed out area used as a shelter or home by animals
  4. (figuratively) dump; a run-down living space, room or house
    Jinne! Jy bly in 'n gat!
    Man! You live in a dump!
  5. (golf) hole; cup

Derived termsEdit

SynonymsEdit

NounEdit

gat (plural gatte, diminutive gatjie)

  1. (vulgar) anus
  2. (crude) rump; buttocks; bum; ass; backside of a human
    Sit op jou gat!
    Sit on your ass!
  3. the backside of animals or objects
    Die olifant staan met sy gat na ons toe.
    The elephant is standing with his backside turned to us.

Derived termsEdit

SynonymsEdit


CatalanEdit

PronunciationEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Late Latin cattus (cat).

NounEdit

gat m (plural gats, feminine gata)

  1. cat (feline animal)
  2. jack (device for lifting heavy objects)
  3. cat shark

SynonymsEdit

Derived termsEdit

  • agafar el gat
  • esgatinyar-se
  • donar gat per llebre
  • el gat i la rata
  • estar com el gat i el gos
  • gat cerval
  • gat d'algàlia
  • gat de mar
  • gat dels frares
  • gat escaldat amb aigua tèbia en té prou
  • gat fer
  • gat mesquer
  • gat salvatge
  • gatada
  • gatinada
  • gatinyar-se
  • gatonera
  • haver-hi gat amagat
  • quatre gats
  • semblar un gat escorxat
  • tenir el gat

DutchEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Middle Dutch gat, from Old Dutch *gat, from Proto-Germanic *gatą.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

gat n (plural gaten, diminutive gaatje n)

  1. A gap, hole
  2. A godforsaken place, hamlet
  3. (vulgar) An arsehole
  4. (archaic) A port

SynonymsEdit

Derived termsEdit

  • buitengaats
  • gaatels
  • gatenkaas
  • gatenteil
  • gatlikker
  • knoopsgat
  • mangat
  • er geen gat in zien (to see no way out)
  • in de gaten (with an eye on)
  • niet voor één gat te vangen (resourceful, slippery)



IcelandicEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old Norse gat, from Proto-Germanic *gatą.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

gat n (genitive singular gats, nominative plural göt)

  1. a hole, a opening
    Passaðu þig á gatinu.
    Mind the gap.

DeclensionEdit

Derived termsEdit

  • standa á gati (to be unable to answer a question, to be at a loss)
  • reka einhvern á gat (to stump somebody, to ask somebody a question he cannot answer)

VerbEdit

gat

  1. first-person singular active present indicative of geta
    Ég gat ekki stöðvað hana.
    I couldn't stop her.
  2. third-person singular active present indicative of geta

LojbanEdit

RafsiEdit

gat

  1. rafsi of gasta.

OccitanEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Late Latin cattus.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

gat m (plural gats, feminine gata, feminine plural, gatas)

  1. A cat

Old EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-Germanic *gaits, from Proto-Indo-European *gʰaid-. Cognate with Old Saxon gēt, Old High German geiz (German Geiß), Old Norse geit (Danish ged, Swedish get), Gothic 𐌲𐌰𐌹𐍄𐍃 (gaits); and with Latin haedus (kid).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

gāt f

  1. A (female) goat, nanny-goat

DeclensionEdit

DescendantsEdit

See alsoEdit


RomagnolEdit

E’ gat

EtymologyEdit

From Latin cattus (cat), from Late Egyptian čaute, feminine of čaus (jungle cat; African wildcat), from earlier tešau (female cat).

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /ˈgat/, [ˈgaɐ̯t]

NounEdit

gat m (plural ghét)

  1. cat (Felis silvestris catus, a domesticated feline commonly kept as a house pet)
    • December 2007, Vincenzo Sanchini, Tigrin e Biancon in la Ludla, il Papiro, page 8:
      S'i padrùn gio tla pianura,\ chi por gat j è armast te' ghét,\ in s'è mòs da meda tl'éra,\ a raspè mla porta tchjusa.

RomanschEdit

Alternative formsEdit

  • (Rumantsch Grischun, Sutsilvan, Surmiran, Puter, Vallader) giat

EtymologyEdit

EB1911 - Volume 01 - Page 001 - 1.svg This entry lacks etymological information. If you are familiar with the origin of this term, please add it to the page as described here.

NounEdit

gat m (plural gats)

  1. (Sursilvan, Sutsilvan) cat

Serbo-CroatianEdit

EtymologyEdit

EB1911 - Volume 01 - Page 001 - 1.svg This entry lacks etymological information. If you are familiar with the origin of this term, please add it to the page as described here.

NounEdit

gat m (Cyrillic spelling гат)

  1. A ditch
  2. A dam

DeclensionEdit


Tok PisinEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From English got.

VerbEdit

gat

  1. have
    • 1989, Buk Baibel long Tok Pisin, Bible Society of Papua New Guinea, Genesis 1:20 (translation here):
      Bihain God i tok olsem, “Solwara i mas pulap long ol kain kain samting i gat laip. Na ol pisin i mas kamap na flai nabaut long skai.”

Derived termsEdit


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Last modified on 10 April 2014, at 16:32