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See also: zoön and zo-on

Contents

EnglishEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

First adopted by Herbert Spencer in Principles of Biology (see 1864 quotation): from New Latin zōon, from Ancient Greek ζῷον (zôion, animal).[1]

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

zoon (plural zoa or zoons)

  1. (biology)[1] An animal which is the sole product of a single egg.
  2. (biology)[1] Any one of the perfectly developed individuals of a compound animal.

QuotationsEdit

  • 1864, Herbert Spencer, Principles of Biology, page 205, § 73 (1868 reprint; D. Appleton & Co.)
    [… A] zoological individual is constituted either by any such single animal as a mammal or bird, which may properly claim the title of a zoon, or by any such group of animals as the numerous Medusæ that have been developed from the same egg, which are to be severally distinguished as zooids.

AntonymsEdit

  • (an animal which is the sole product of a single egg): zooid

Part or all of this entry has been imported from the 1913 edition of Webster’s Dictionary, which is now free of copyright and hence in the public domain. The imported definitions may be significantly out of date, and any more recent senses may be completely missing.
(See the entry for zoon in
Webster’s Revised Unabridged Dictionary, G. & C. Merriam, 1913.)

ReferencesEdit

  1. 1.0 1.1 1.2 1.3 ‖zoon, n.” listed in the Oxford English Dictionary [2nd Ed.; 1989]

AnagramsEdit


DutchEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Middle Dutch sōne, from Old Dutch suno, from Proto-Germanic *sunuz, from Proto-Indo-European *suHnús.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

zoon m (plural zoons or zonen, diminutive zoontje n)

  1. son
    Mijn zoon wil met de jouwe spelen.
    My son wants to play with yours.

DescendantsEdit

See alsoEdit

AnagramsEdit


EsperantoEdit

NounEdit

zoon

  1. accusative singular of zoo

LimburgishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Middle Dutch sōne, from Old Dutch suno, from Proto-Germanic *sunuz, from Proto-Indo-European *suHnús.

NounEdit

zoon m (plural zeuns)

  1. son