Last modified on 5 August 2014, at 22:55
See also: ah

EnglishEdit

PronunciationEdit

As an interjection the word is pronounced basically the same way as the interjection ah but the double a stresses prolongation. In the noun and the verb there is no extra prolongation.

InterjectionEdit

aah

  1. Indication of amazement or surprise or enthusiasm.
    Aah! That's amazing!
  2. Indication of joyful pleasure.
  3. Indication of sympathy.
  4. Indication of mouth being opened wide.
    Dentists would always instruct, say aah!
  5. To express understanding.
    Aah. Now I understand.

The sound of one screaming (with as many a's or h's needed for emphasis.) AAAHH! A bug! A bug! Get it off me! Get it off me!

TranslationsEdit

NounEdit

aah (plural aahs)

  1. Expression of amazement or surprise or enthusiasm.
  2. Expression of joy and/or pleasure.
  3. The exclamation aah.

Related termsEdit

TranslationsEdit

TranslationsEdit

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VerbEdit

aah (third-person singular simple present aahs, present participle aahing, simple past and past participle aahed)

  1. To say or exclaim aah.
    1. To express amazement or surprise or enthusiasm, especially by the interjection aah.
      Everyone who came by oohed and aahed over her new appearance.
    2. To express joy or pleasure, especially by the interjection aah.

Usage notesEdit

  • Usually the verb is intransitive. The object of feelings usually is indicated by the prepositions over or at; sometimes it occurs as a direct object, especially in passive constructions.
  • Very often the word is used together with some other verb derived from an interjection. The most common combination is to ooh and aah. Perhaps it should be regarded as a separate lexical item.
  • The word belongs to the informal style.

TranslationsEdit

AnagramsEdit


ManxEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old Irish ath (compare Scottish Gaelic àth).

NounEdit

aah f (genitive aah, plural aahghyn or aaghyn)

  1. ford