See also: Ay, ẩy, ấy, and

EnglishEdit

PronunciationEdit

InterjectionEdit

ay

  1. Ah! alas!
  2. Alternative spelling of aye ("yes")
    • 1883, Howard Pyle, The Merry Adventures of Robin Hood Chapter V
      "Good morrow to thee, jolly fellow," quoth Robin, "thou seemest happy this merry morn."
      "Ay, that am I," quoth the jolly Butcher, "and why should I not be so? Am I not hale in wind and limb? Have I not the bonniest lass in all Nottinghamshire? And lastly, am I not to be married to her on Thursday next in sweet Locksley Town?"
  3. New Zealand spelling of eh (question tag)

AdverbEdit

ay (not comparable)

  1. Always; ever.
    • 1670, John Barbour, The Acts and Life of the most victorious Conquerour Robert Bruce King of Scotland, as cited in 1860, Thomas Corser, Collectanea Anglo-poetica, page 160
      O he that hath ay lived free, [...]

Alternative formsEdit

AdjectiveEdit

ay (not comparable)

  1. For an indefinite time.

SynonymsEdit

NounEdit

ay (plural ays)

  1. Alternative spelling of aye ("yes")
    counting the ays and the noes in a vote

See alsoEdit

AnagramsEdit


AzeriEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old Turkic ay, from Proto-Turkic.

NounEdit

Other scripts
Cyrillic ај
Roman ay
Perso-Arabic آی

ay (definite accusative ayı, plural aylar)

  1. moon
  2. month

DeclensionEdit


Crimean TatarEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old Turkic ay, from Proto-Turkic.

NounEdit

ay

  1. month
  2. moon

DeclensionEdit

ReferencesEdit


GagauzEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Old Turkic ay, from Proto-Turkic.

NounEdit

ay (definite accusative ayı, plural aylar)

  1. moon
  2. month

Etymology 2Edit

From Ancient Greek ἅγιος (hagios).

NounEdit

ay (definite accusative ayı, plural aylar)

  1. saint

LadinoEdit

VerbEdit

ay (Latin spelling)

  1. there is, there are

Middle FrenchEdit

VerbEdit

ay

  1. first-person singular present indicative of avoir

ScotsEdit

EtymologyEdit

Probably from a use of aye to express agreement.

AdverbEdit

ay (not comparable)

  1. yes

SpanishEdit

PronunciationEdit

InterjectionEdit

¡ay!

  1. Expresses pain or sorrow.
  2. A stereotypical sound of a Latino or Latina (e.g. ¡Ay Papi!, something like saying "Oh Baby!")

Sranan TongoEdit

EtymologyEdit

From English eye.

NounEdit

ay

  1. eye

TagalogEdit

PrepositionEdit

ay

  1. Equality marker. It can be translated as is, am, are, was, will be, etc., but functions as a preposition, not a verb.
  2. Verb/predicate marker. Only used when the verb or predicate does not begin the sentence.

TurkishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old Turkic ay, from Proto-Turkic.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

ay (objective definite ayı)

  1. month
  2. An interjection expressing a sharp pain: ouch!

Usage notesEdit

  • Ay means moon, not ay (the first "A" is capitalized)
Last modified on 6 April 2014, at 22:39