Last modified on 11 November 2014, at 06:28

pleasure

EnglishEdit

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EtymologyEdit

From Early Modern English pleasur, plesur, alteration (with ending accommodated to -ure), of Middle English plaisir (pleasure), from Old French plesir, plaisir (to please), infinitive used as a noun, conjugated form of plaisir or plaire, from Latin placēre (to please, to seem good), from the Proto-Indo-European *plā-k- (wide and flat). More at please.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

pleasure (plural pleasures)

  1. (uncountable) A state of being pleased.
    He remembered with pleasure his home and family.
    I get a lot of pleasure from watching others work hard while I relax.
    • 2012 April 22, Sam Sheringham, “Liverpool 0-1 West Brom”, BBC Sport:
      But the only statistic that will concern West Brom will be the scoreline, and their manager Roy Hodgson will take considerable pleasure from a victory over the club he managed for just 191 days.
  2. (countable) A person, thing or action that causes enjoyment.
    It was a pleasure to meet you.
    Having a good night's sleep is one of life's little pleasures.
    • Bible, Acts xxv. 9
      Festus, willing to do the Jews a pleasure
    • 1898, Winston Churchill, chapter 8, The Celebrity:
      The humor of my proposition appealed more strongly to Miss Trevor than I had looked for, and from that time forward she became her old self again; [] . Now she had come to look upon the matter in its true proportions, and her anticipation of a possible chance of teaching him a lesson was a pleasure to behold.
    • 2013 May 17, George Monbiot, “Money just makes the rich suffer”, The Guardian Weekly, volume 188, number 23, page 19: 
      In order to grant the rich these pleasures, the social contract is reconfigured. The welfare state is dismantled. […]
  3. (uncountable) One's preference.
    What is your pleasure: coffee or tea?
  4. (formal, uncountable) The will or desire of someone or some agency in power.
    to hold an office at pleasure: to hold it indefinitely until it is revoked
    to be imprisoned at Her Majesty's pleasure: to be imprisoned indefinitely
    at Congress's pleasure: whenever or as long as Congress desires
    • Bible, Isaiah xlviii. 14
      He will do his pleasure on Babylon.
    • William Shakespeare (1564-1616)
      Use your pleasure; if your love do not persuade you to come, let not my letter.

SynonymsEdit

AntonymsEdit

TranslationsEdit

TranslationsEdit

Derived termsEdit

InterjectionEdit

pleasure

  1. pleased to meet you

Related termsEdit

VerbEdit

pleasure (third-person singular simple present pleasures, present participle pleasuring, simple past and past participle pleasured)

  1. (transitive) To give or afford pleasure to; to please; to gratify.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Shakespeare to this entry?)
    • Tennyson
      [Rolled] his hoop to pleasure Edith.
  2. (transitive) to give pleasure (especially sexual pleasure) to
    Johnny pleasured Jackie orally last night.
  3. (intransitive, dated) To take pleasure; to seek or pursue pleasure.
    to go pleasuring

External linksEdit