Last modified on 3 September 2014, at 01:46

circular

EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Middle English, from Old French circulier, from Latin circularis, from circulus, diminutive of circus (ring).

PronunciationEdit

  • (file)

AdjectiveEdit

circular (comparative more circular, superlative most circular)

  1. Of or relating to a circle.
  2. In the shape of, or moving in a circle.
    • 1918, W. B. Maxwell, chapter 5, The Mirror and the Lamp:
      Here, in the transept and choir, where the service was being held, one was conscious every moment of an increasing brightness; colours glowing vividly beneath the circular chandeliers, and the rows of small lights on the choristers' desks flashed and sparkled in front of the boys' faces, deep linen collars, and red neckbands.
  3. Circuitous or roundabout.
  4. Referring back to itself, so as to prevent computation or comprehension; infinitely recursive.
    circular reasoning
    Your dictionary defines "brave" as "courageous", and "courageous" as "brave". That's a circular definition.
    a circular formula in a spreadsheet
  5. Distributed to a large number of persons.
    • Hallam
      a proclamation of Henry III., [] doubtless circular throughout England
  6. (obsolete) Perfect; complete.
    • Massinger
      A man so absolute and circular / In all those wished-for rarities that may take / A virgin captive.
  7. (archaic) Adhering to a fixed circle of legends; cyclic; hence, mean; inferior.
    • Dennis
      Had Virgil been a circular poet, and closely adhered to history, how could the Romans have had Dido?

Derived termsEdit

Related termsEdit

TranslationsEdit

NounEdit

circular (plural circulars)

  1. A printed advertisement, directive, or notice intended for mass distribution; a flyer
  2. In administration, a circular letter
  3. (dated) A sleeveless cloak, cut in circular form.

TranslationsEdit

See alsoEdit


AsturianEdit

AdjectiveEdit

circular (epicene, plural circulares)

  1. circular

Related termsEdit

VerbEdit

circular

  1. to circle

ConjugationEdit


GalicianEdit

AdjectiveEdit

circular m, f (plural circulares)

  1. circular

Related termsEdit


PortugueseEdit

EtymologyEdit

EB1911 - Volume 01 - Page 001 - 1.svg This entry lacks etymological information. If you are familiar with the origin of this term, please add it to the page as described here.

PronunciationEdit

AdjectiveEdit

circular m, f (plural circulares; comparable)

  1. circular, round

NounEdit

circular m (plural circulares)

  1. circular (publication)

VerbEdit

circular (first-person singular present indicative circulo, past participle circulado)

  1. to circulate
  2. to circle

ConjugationEdit


SpanishEdit

Etymology 1Edit

Borrowed from Latin circulāris.

AdjectiveEdit

circular m, f (plural circulares)

  1. circular

NounEdit

circular f (plural circulares)

  1. circular (advertisement)

Etymology 2Edit

Borrowed from Latin circulāre, present active infinitive of circulō.

VerbEdit

circular (first-person singular present circulo, first-person singular preterite circulé, past participle circulado)

  1. to circulate
ConjugationEdit