Last modified on 17 July 2014, at 14:04

EnglishEdit

Wikipedia has an article on:

Wikipedia

EtymologyEdit

From Scots jo (joy).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

jo (plural jos)

  1. (Scotland) Darling, sweetheart.
    • 1711, traditional, published by James Watson, Old Long Syne:
      On Old long syne my Jo,
      on Old long syne,
      That thou canst never once reflect,
      on Old long syne.

AnagramsEdit


AlbanianEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-Albanian *nio not, no, from Proto-Indo-European *nĕ, *nē 'negative particle'. Compare Latin ne, Welsh neu, Old English na, Lithuanian ne (not).

PronunciationEdit

DeterminerEdit

jo

  1. no, not
Related termsEdit

BasqueEdit

VerbEdit

jo

  1. hit

BavarianEdit

AdverbEdit

jo

  1. yes

CatalanEdit

PronunciationEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Vulgar Latin *eo, attested from the 6th century in Romance, from Latin ego.; akin to Greek εγώ (egó), Sanskrit aham, all from Proto-Indo-European *éǵh₂.

PronounEdit

jo (strong)

  1. I
  2. (after certain prepositions) me

SynonymsEdit

  • mi (after most prepositions)

DeclensionEdit


CzechEdit

PronunciationEdit

ParticleEdit

jo

  1. (colloquial) yeah, yep

SynonymsEdit

AntonymsEdit


DalmatianEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin ubi. Compare Romanian iuo, Italian ove, French , Old Spanish o.

PronunciationEdit

AdverbEdit

jo

  1. where

DutchEdit

EtymologyEdit

From English yo.

InterjectionEdit

jo

  1. hi
    Ey! - Jo! - Hey! - Hi!
  2. bye
    Later! - Jo! - Later! - Bye!
  3. you too
    Fijn weekend! - Jo! - Have a nice weekend! - You too!

EsperantoEdit

NounEdit

jo (plural jo-oj, accusative singular jo-on, accusative plural jo-ojn)

  1. The name of the Latin-script letter J/j.

See alsoEdit


FinnishEdit

EtymologyEdit

Cognate with Estonian juba. According to Eesti etümoloogiasõnaraamat ultimately a borrowing from Proto-Germanic *ju, compare Gothic 𐌾𐌿 (ju, already), Old High German ju (already).

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): [ˈjo̞]
  • Rhymes: -o
  • Hyphenation: jo

AdverbEdit

jo

  1. already
    Luin kirjan jo loppuun.
    I already finished the book.
  2. now (emphasizing word)
    (impatiently) Tule jo!
    Come now!

See alsoEdit


FriulianEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Vulgar Latin *eo, attested from the 6th century in Romance, from Latin ego.; akin to Greek εγώ (egó), Sanskrit aham, all from Proto-Indo-European *éǵh₂.

PronounEdit

jo

  1. I

See alsoEdit


GermanEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

Dialectal variant of ja (yes).

PronunciationEdit

InterjectionEdit

jo

  1. (colloquial) yes

Usage notesEdit

Depending on length and intonation, the word can either express actual agreement (like standard ja), or a hesitant kind of agreement (in this case often very open and strongly lengthened; IPA(key): [jɒːː]). There may also be regional pronunciation and usage differences.


ItalianEdit

PronounEdit

jo

  1. Obsolete form of io.

JapaneseEdit

RomanizationEdit

jo

  1. rōmaji reading of じょ
  2. rōmaji reading of ジョ
  3. rōmaji reading of ぢょ
  4. rōmaji reading of ヂョ

KashubianEdit

InterjectionEdit

jo

  1. yes

LithuanianEdit

PronunciationEdit

DeterminerEdit

jo

  1. his (3rd person singular masculine possessive)

PronounEdit

jo m

  1. (third-person singular) genitive form of jis.

LivonianEdit

Alternative formsEdit

Etymology 1Edit

Perhaps a borrowing of Latvian jo (because, yet (more)), /juo/.

PronunciationEdit

PrepositionEdit

jo

  1. more; used with adjectives to form comparatives
    pitkā, jo pitkā – long, longer

Etymology 2Edit

Perhaps a borrowing of Latvian jau (yet, already, after all). However, compare also Finnish jo (already), thus ultimately a common Finnic borrowing from Proto-Germanic that has likely been contaminated by the more figurative senses of Latvian jau, with the latter ultimately a distant cognate of the initial Germanic borrowing.

PronunciationEdit

PrepositionEdit

jo

  1. yet, already, after all
    mōnigļikizt, ne jo lǟbõd mōzõ – bumblebees, they are already migrating to their burrows (lit. "going inside of earth")
    amād jo ītist äb peļļõt – not everyone makes the same [amount of money] (lit. "everyone after all doesn't earn the same")

Usage notesEdit

  • LEL only lists jo without listing any instances of juo. Livonian-Latvian-Livonian dictionary, in turn, only lists juo for the comparative forming preposition sense.
  • LĒL doesn't explicitly list the second sense that seems to exactly mirror Latvian jau (including the more figurative applications.) Such a function, however, is inferred from the many usage examples available in the dictionary. As a translation of Latvian jau (strictly in its temporal sense) LĒL lists jõbā (already), cf. Estonian juba.

LojbanEdit

CmavoEdit

jo (rafsi jov)

  1. (conjunction) if and only if. Joins two predicate words in a complex predicate.

Derived termsEdit

Related termsEdit


Lower SorbianEdit

PronunciationEdit

ParticleEdit

jo

  1. yes (word used to show agreement or acceptance)

VerbEdit

jo

  1. third-person singular present of byś

PronounEdit

jo

  1. accusative of wóno

Related termsEdit

  • njo (after preposition)

LuxembourgishEdit

PronunciationEdit

AdverbEdit

jo

  1. yes

See alsoEdit


NorwegianEdit

PronunciationEdit

AdverbEdit

jo

  1. yes; in disagreement with the last speaker.
    Du har ikke pusset tennene vel? - Jo, (det har jeg)
    You haven't brushed your teeth, have you? - Yes, I have
  2. yes or no; expressing doubt. (colloquial)
    Vil du være med? - Jo...
    Do you want to join? - I'm not sure

Usage notesEdit

ja can be interpreted as an agreement with the person replied to. jo is used instead of ja if this agreement could cause ambiguity. In example 1, agreement with the person asking the question would be the opposite of a confirmation that one actually did brush the teeth. As such ja would be ambiguous. The answer jo removes the possibility of agreement with the speaker.

Related termsEdit


OccitanEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Vulgar Latin *eo, attested from the 6th century in Romance, from Latin ego.

PronunciationEdit

PronounEdit

jo

  1. (Gascony) I

Old FrenchEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Vulgar Latin *eo, attested from the 6th century in Romance, from Latin ego.

PronounEdit

jo

  1. I

Old FrisianEdit

PronounEdit

  1. Alternative form of , accusative and dative form of

DeclensionEdit


SpanishEdit

InterjectionEdit

¡Jo!

  1. Used to express surprise, amazement, or confusion.
    Jo!
    I never heard anything like that before.
    Jo!
    Are you serious?
    Jo!
    Boy!
  2. stop (especially when commanding a horse or imitative thereof)

SwedishEdit

PronunciationEdit

InterjectionEdit

jo

  1. yes; used as a disagreement to a negative statement.
    Du har inte borstat tänderna, eller hur? - Jo, det har jag.
    "You haven't brushed your teeth, have you? - Yes, I have."

Usage notesEdit

Ja (yes) can be interpreted as an agreement with the person replied to. Jo is used instead of ja if this agreement could cause ambiguity. In the example above agreement with the person asking the question would be the opposite of a confirmation that one actually did brush the teeth. As such ja would be ambiguous. The answer jo removes the possibility of agreement with the speaker.

In northern Sweden it is however not uncommon for the word jo to be used in place of ja in all cases, at least in spoken language.


West FrisianEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old Frisian , from Proto-Germanic *izwiz, dative/accusative of *jūz, from Proto-Indo-European *yū́. Compare English you, Dutch jou, u, Low German jo, ju, German euch.

PronounEdit

jo

  1. you (polite)
  2. your (polite)

Usage notesEdit

Though it is a singular pronoun, jo takes the plural conjugation of verbs.