See also: -cum, cùm, cúm, cụm, and CUM

EnglishEdit

PronunciationEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Latin cum (with).

PrepositionEdit

cum

  1. Used in indicating a thing with two roles, functions, or natures, or a thing that has changed from one to another.
    He built a bus-cum-greenhouse (= he converted a bus to a greenhouse) that made a bold statement, but the plants in it didn't live very long.
    • p. 1926, a. 1950, George Bernard Shaw, Collected Letters: 1926-1950,[1] University of California/Viking (1985), page 31,
      He is too good an actor to need that sort of tomfoolery: the effect will be far better if he is a credible mining camp elder-cum-publican.
    • 2001 Nov/Dec, David Sachs, “LET THEM EAT BITS”, American Spectator, volume 34, number 8, page 78: 
      The banner shows a yellowed silhouette of a boy (possibly Calvin, of Calvin & Hobbes) urinating on an EU flag. Sites such as this show the full power of the Internet as a propaganda medium cum travel service cum organizing tool. Oh, and nightlife directory.

ConjunctionEdit

cum

  1. Used in indicating a thing with two or more roles, functions, or natures, or a thing that has changed from one to another.
    But instead of being a salesperson cum barista cum waitress merely serving the wordsmiths, I'm one of them, reading her latest baby out loud.
QuotationsEdit

Etymology 2Edit

Variant of come.

NounEdit

cum (uncountable)

  1. (informal) Semen.
  2. (slang) Female ejaculatory discharge.
SynonymsEdit
Derived termsEdit
TranslationsEdit
The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Help:How to check translations.

VerbEdit

cum (third-person singular simple present cums, present participle cumming, simple past came or less commonly cummed, past participle came, cum, or uncommonly cummed)

  1. (slang) To have an orgasm, to feel the sensation of an orgasm.
  2. (slang) To ejaculate.
    • 1997 July 14, Harold Perrineau as Augustus Hill, “Visits, Conjugal, and Otherwise”, Oz season 1 episode 2:
      I got no sensation down there, so I don't know when I'm hard, I don't know when I cum. My wife's gotta tell me.
SynonymsEdit

(have an orgasm): climax

TranslationsEdit

AnagramsEdit


AromanianEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Vulgar Latin *quomo, from Latin quomodo.

AdverbEdit

cum

  1. how

ConjunctionEdit

cum

  1. how

IrishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old Irish cummaid

PronunciationEdit

VerbEdit

cum (present analytic cumann, future analytic cumfaidh, verbal noun cumadh, past participle cumtha)

  1. to form, shape
  2. to compose
  3. to devise
  4. to invent
  5. to limit, ration

InflectionEdit

MutationEdit

Irish mutation
Radical Lenition Eclipsis
cum chum gcum
Note: Some of these forms may be hypothetical. Not every
possible mutated form of every word actually occurs.

LatinEdit

PronunciationEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Proto-Italic *kom, from Proto-Indo-European *ḱóm (next to, at, with, along). Cognate with Gothic 𐌲𐌰- (ga-), Old English ge-, Old High German gi-, Russian ко (ko, to), Persian prefix هم (ham, co-, same), Old High German hansa (company, host, troop). More at hanse.

PrepositionEdit

cum (+ ablative)

  1. with
    Titus cum familiā habitat. — "Titus lives with his family."
    magnā cum laude — "with great praise."
Derived termsEdit
DescendantsEdit
  • Macanese: co
  • Megleno Romanian: cu
  • Mirandese: cun
  • Neapolitan: cu
  • Old Portuguese: con
  • Piedmontese: cun
  • Portuguese: com
  • Romagnol: cun
  • Romanian: cu
  • Romansch: cun
  • Sardinian: chin, cun
  • Sicilian: cu
  • Spanish: con
  • Upper Guinea Crioulo: ku
  • Venetian: co

Etymology 2Edit

From Proto-Indo-European *kʷóm. Cognate with Gothic 𐍈𐌰𐌽 (ƕan).

Alternative formsEdit

ConjunctionEdit

cum (+ subjunctive)

  1. when
  2. because
  3. although
Usage notesEdit
  • In the sense of when, if there is no causal link between the verb in the dependent clause and the verb in the main clause (sometimes called an inverted cum-clause, as the 'main action' of the sentence occurs in the dependent clause), the indicative is used rather than the subjunctive.
    per viam ambulābāmus cum pugnam vīdimus. [not *vīderīmus] — "We were walking through the street when we happened to witness a fight."
Related termsEdit

LojbanEdit

RafsiEdit

cum

  1. rafsi of cumki.

ManxEdit

Etymology 1Edit

EB1911 - Volume 01 - Page 001 - 1.svg This entry lacks etymological information. If you are familiar with the origin of this term, please add it to the page as described here.

VerbEdit

cum (verbal noun cummal)

  1. to grip, hold
  2. to keep, arrest, retain
  3. to contain
  4. to live, inhabit
  5. to celebrate
MutationEdit
Manx mutation
Radical Lenition Eclipsis
cum chum gum
Note: Some of these forms may be hypothetical. Not every
possible mutated form of every word actually occurs.

Etymology 2Edit

EB1911 - Volume 01 - Page 001 - 1.svg This entry lacks etymological information. If you are familiar with the origin of this term, please add it to the page as described here.

VerbEdit

cum (verbal noun cummey)

  1. to plan, devise
  2. to fabricate, shape, mould
  3. to indite
MutationEdit
Manx mutation
Radical Lenition Eclipsis
cum chum gum
Note: Some of these forms may be hypothetical. Not every
possible mutated form of every word actually occurs.

Old FrenchEdit

ConjunctionEdit

cum

  1. Alternative form of conme.

RohingyaEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Bengali.

NounEdit

cum

  1. kiss

RomanianEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Vulgar Latin *quomo, from Latin quomodo.

PronunciationEdit

AdverbEdit

cum

  1. how
    Cum ți-ar plăcea cafeaua?
    How would you like your coffee?
    Nu știu cum să spun "how" în românește
    I don't know how to say "how" in Romanian.

ConjunctionEdit

cum

  1. how
  2. as, since, because

ScotsEdit

PronunciationEdit

VerbEdit

cum

  1. to come

Scottish GaelicEdit

Alternative formsEdit

PronunciationEdit

Etymology 1Edit

EB1911 - Volume 01 - Page 001 - 1.svg This entry lacks etymological information. If you are familiar with the origin of this term, please add it to the page as described here.

VerbEdit

cum (verbal noun cumail)

  1. keep, hold
    cùm seo dhomhsa gu Dihaoine - keep this for me till Friday
    chùm i an taigh glan - she kept the house clean
    cha do chùm e ris a’ bhargan - he didn’t keep [his part of] the bargain
  2. keep, continue
Derived termsEdit

Etymology 2Edit

EB1911 - Volume 01 - Page 001 - 1.svg This entry lacks etymological information. If you are familiar with the origin of this term, please add it to the page as described here.

VerbEdit

cum (verbal noun cumadh)

  1. shape, form
Last modified on 14 April 2014, at 14:14