Last modified on 24 August 2014, at 19:22

diffuse

See also: diffusé

EnglishEdit

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Etymology 1Edit

Middle English, from Latin diffusus, past participle of diffundere, from dis- + fundere

PronunciationEdit

VerbEdit

diffuse (third-person singular simple present diffuses, present participle diffusing, simple past and past participle diffused)

  1. (transitive) To spread over or through as in air, water, or other matter, especially by fluid motion or passive means.
    • Whewell
      We find this knowledge diffused among all civilized nations.
  2. (intransitive) To be spread over or through as in air, water, or other matter, especially by fluid motion or passive means.
    Food coloring diffuses in water.
    The riot diffused quite suddenly.
Derived termsEdit
TranslationsEdit

Etymology 2Edit

Latin diffusus

PronunciationEdit

AdjectiveEdit

diffuse (comparative more diffuse, superlative most diffuse)

  1. Everywhere or throughout everything; not focused or concentrated.
    Such a diffuse effort is unlikely to produce good results.
Derived termsEdit
TranslationsEdit

Related termsEdit

ReferencesEdit


FrenchEdit

PronunciationEdit

VerbEdit

diffuse

  1. first-person singular present indicative of diffuser
  2. third-person singular present indicative of diffuser
  3. first-person singular present subjunctive of diffuser
  4. third-person singular present subjunctive of diffuser
  5. second-person singular imperative of diffuser

AdjectiveEdit

diffuse

  1. feminine form of diffus

GermanEdit

AdjectiveEdit

diffuse

  1. inflected form of diffus

ItalianEdit

VerbEdit

diffuse

  1. third-person singular past historic of diffondere

diffuse f pl

  1. feminine plural of diffuso

AdjectiveEdit

diffuse

  1. feminine plural of diffuso

LatinEdit

EtymologyEdit

From diffūsus (scattered, spread)

AdverbEdit

diffūsē (comparative diffūsius, superlative diffūsissimē)

  1. diffusely, in a scattered manner.
  2. copiously, fully

Related termsEdit

ReferencesEdit

  • Charlton T. Lewis (1891) An Elementary Latin Dictionary, 1st edition. (Oxford University Press)