Last modified on 24 August 2014, at 18:30

fortune

EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old French fortune, from Latin fortuna (fate, luck). The plural form fortunae meant “possessions”, which also gave fortune the meaning of “riches”.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

fortune (plural fortunes)

  1. Destiny, especially favorable.
    She read my fortune. Apparently I will have a good love life this week, but I will have a bad week for money.
    • Mrs. Cowley (1743-1809)
      you, who men's fortunes in their faces read
    • 1959, Georgette Heyer, chapter 1, The Unknown Ajax:
      [] his lordship was out of humour. That was the way Chollacombe described as knaggy an old gager as ever Charles had had the ill-fortune to serve.
  2. A prediction or set of predictions about a person's future provided by a fortune teller.
  3. A small slip of paper with wise or vaguely prophetic words printed on it, baked into a fortune cookie.
  4. The arrival of something in a sudden or unexpected manner; chance; accident.
  5. Good luck.
    Fortune favors the brave.
    • William Shakespeare (1564-1616)
      There is a tide in the affairs of men, / Which, taken at the flood, leads on to fortune.
  6. One's wealth; the amount of money one has; especially, if it is vast.
    He's amassed a small fortune working in the Middle East.
    My vast fortune was a result of inheritance and stock market nous.
    Her fortune is estimated at 3 million dollars.
  7. A large amount of money.
    That car must be worth a fortune! How could you afford it?

SynonymsEdit

AntonymsEdit

Derived termsEdit

TranslationsEdit

VerbEdit

fortune (third-person singular simple present fortunes, present participle fortuning, simple past and past participle fortuned)

  1. (obsolete, intransitive) To happen, take place. [14th-19th c.]
    • 1526, William Tyndale, trans. Bible, Matthew ch. 8:
      Then the heerdmen, fleed and went there ways into the cite, and tolde everythinge, and what had fortuned unto them that were possessed of the devyls.
    • 1885, Sir Richard Burton, “Night 20”, in The Book of the Thousand Nights and a Night:
  2. To provide with a fortune.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Richardson to this entry?)
  3. To presage; to tell the fortune of.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Dryden to this entry?)

StatisticsEdit

AnagramsEdit


FrenchEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from Latin fortūna.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

fortune f (plural fortunes)

  1. fortune
    faire une fortune
    make a fortune
    faire fortune
    make a fortune

Related termsEdit

External linksEdit


ItalianEdit

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

fortune f

  1. plural form of fortuna

AnagramsEdit


Middle EnglishEdit

NounEdit

fortune (plural fortunes)

  1. fortune (fate, chance)

DescendantsEdit


Middle FrenchEdit

NounEdit

fortune f (plural fortunes)

  1. fortune (fate, chance)

DescendantsEdit


NovialEdit

NounEdit

fortune (uncountable)

  1. good luck