Last modified on 16 November 2014, at 22:11

gem

See also: gêm

EnglishEdit

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EtymologyEdit

From Old French gemme, from Latin gemma. Replaced or conflated with Old English ġimm, of same origin.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

gem (plural gems)

  1. A precious stone, usually of substantial monetary value or prized for its beauty or shine.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Milton to this entry?)
    • 2012 March 1, Lee A. Groat, “Gemstones”, American Scientist, volume 100, number 2, page 128: 
      Although there are dozens of different types of gems, among the best known and most important are diamond, ruby and sapphire, emerald and other gem forms of the mineral beryl, chrysoberyl, tanzanite, tsavorite, topaz and jade.
  2. (figuratively) any precious or highly valued thing or person
    She's an absolute gem.
  3. Anything of small size, or expressed within brief limits, which is regarded as a gem on account of its beauty or value, such as a small picture, a verse of poetry, or an epigram.
    a gem of wit
  4. (obsolete) a gemma or leaf-bud
    • Denham
      From the joints of thy prolific stem / A swelling knot is raised called a gem.
  5. a type of geometrid moth, Orthonama obstipata
  6. (computing) A package containing programs or libraries for the Ruby programming language.

SynonymsEdit

TranslationsEdit

VerbEdit

gem (third-person singular simple present gems, present participle gemming, simple past and past participle gemmed)

  1. (transitive) To adorn with, or as if with, gems.
    • 1827, Various, The Mirror of Literature, Amusement, and Instruction, Vol. 10,[1]:
      A few bright and beautiful stars gemmed the wide concave of heaven [] .
    • 1872, J. Fenimore Cooper, The Bravo[2]:
      Above was the firmament, gemmed with worlds, and sublime in immensity.
    • 1920, John Freeman, Poems New and Old[3]:
      The rain Shook from fruit bushes in new showers again As I brushed past, and gemmed the window pane.

See alsoEdit

AnagramsEdit


MeriamEdit

NounEdit

gem

  1. body

RomanianEdit

gem

Etymology 1Edit

From English jam.

NounEdit

gem n (plural gemuri)

  1. jam (sweet mixture of fruit boiled with sugar)
DeclensionEdit

Etymology 2Edit

VerbEdit

gem

  1. first-person singular present tense form of geme.
  2. first-person singular subjunctive form of geme.
  3. third-person plural present tense form of geme.

SwedishEdit

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

gem n

  1. a paper clip
  2. (tennis) a game; part of a set

DeclensionEdit


VolapükEdit

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

gem (plural gems)

  1. sibling

DeclensionEdit

HyponymsEdit

Derived termsEdit

  • (collective) gemef (brother(s) and/or sister(s))
  • (adjective) gemik (sibling)