Last modified on 7 December 2014, at 06:59

gens

EnglishEdit

Etymology 1Edit

Shortened from generations.

AbbreviationEdit

gens

  1. generations
See alsoEdit

Etymology 2Edit

Wikipedia has an article on:

Wikipedia

From Latin gēns (gens; tribe, people); see also gentile, gender, genus, generate.

NounEdit

gens (plural gentes or genses)

  1. (historical) A legally defined unit of Roman society, being a collection of people related by birth, marriage or adoption, but allowing a greater amount of time between members and their common ancestor than is commonly implied by the term related.
  2. (anthropology) A tribal subgroup whose members are characterized by having the same descent, usually along the male line.
    • 1919, Boris Sidis, The Source and Aim of Human Progress:
      The taboos, the laws, the rules of genses, tribes, and nations, from the lowest to the highest, are upheld by a vague terror and sacred awe which society impresses on man by threats of ill-luck, fearful evil, and terrible punishments befalling sinners and transgressors of the tabooed, of the holy and the forbidden, charged with a mysterious, highly contagious, and virulently infective life-consuming energy.

Usage notesEdit

(historical Roman unit of society): The concept is close to and often translated as clan, but the two are not identical. The alternative tribe is also sometimes used, but the Latin tribus has a separate meaning.

SynonymsEdit

(historical Roman unit of society): clan, tribe

AnagramsEdit


CatalanEdit

AdverbEdit

gens

  1. a bit
  2. a few

FrenchEdit

EtymologyEdit

From an earlier gents, plural of gent, from Latin gentem, accusative of gēns.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

gens m pl

  1. (plural only) set of people
    Ces gens-là ont toujours été sympas avec moi.
    Those people have always been kind to me.
    Je n’aime pas les gens qui se prennent pour le nombril du monde.
    I don't like people who think the world revolves around them.

Related termsEdit

See alsoEdit

External linksEdit


GuernésiaisEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin gēns.

NounEdit

gens m pl

  1. (plural only) people

LatinEdit

Latin Wikipedia has an article on:

Wikipedia la

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-Indo-European *ǵénh₁tis[1], from *ǵenh₁-, from which also gignō, generō, genus.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

gēns f (genitive gentis); third declension

  1. Roman clan, related by birth or marriage and sharing a common name.
  2. tribe; people
  3. the chief gods

InflectionEdit

Third declension i-stem.

Number Singular Plural
nominative gēns gentēs
genitive gentis gentium
dative gentī gentibus
accusative gentem gentēs
gentīs
ablative gente gentibus
vocative gēns gentēs

Derived termsEdit

DescendantsEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ “kind”; in: M. Philippa e.a., Etymologisch Woordenboek van het Nederlands

SwedishEdit

NounEdit

gens

  1. indefinite genitive singular of gen