Last modified on 2 December 2014, at 01:20

innocent

EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

Old French inocent, from Latin innocens (harmless, inoffensive), from in- (not) + nocēns, present participle of noceō (to hurt).

PronunciationEdit

AdjectiveEdit

innocent (comparative more innocent, superlative most innocent)

  1. ​Free from guilt, sin, or immorality.
  2. Bearing no legal responsibility for a wrongful act.
  3. Naive; artless.
  4. (obsolete) Not harmful; innocuous; harmless.
    an innocent medicine or remedy
    • Alexander Pope
      The spear / Sung innocent, and spent its force in air.
  5. (with of) Having no knowledge (of something).
  6. (with of) Lacking (something).
  7. Lawful; permitted.
    an innocent trade
  8. Not contraband; not subject to forfeiture.
    innocent goods carried to a belligerent nation

SynonymsEdit

AntonymsEdit

  • (bearing no legal responsibility for a wrongful act): guilty, nocent

Related termsEdit

TranslationsEdit

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NounEdit

innocent (plural innocents)

  1. Those who are innocent; young children.
    The slaughter of the innocents was a significant event in the New Testament.

CatalanEdit

PronunciationEdit

AdjectiveEdit

innocent m, f (masculine and feminine plural innocents)

  1. innocent

Derived termsEdit

Related termsEdit

See alsoEdit


FrenchEdit

EtymologyEdit

Old French inocent, from Latin innocens (harmless, inoffensive), from in- (not) + nocēns, present participle of noceō (to hurt).

PronunciationEdit

AdjectiveEdit

innocent m (feminine innocente, masculine plural innocents, feminine plural innocentes)

  1. innocent

Related termsEdit

External linksEdit