Last modified on 11 October 2014, at 19:15
See also: non and nón

EnglishEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Latin non, from Old Latin noenu, noenum, from neoenum (not one). See none.

PronunciationEdit

PrefixEdit

non-

  1. Used in the sense of not, to negate the meaning of the word to which it is prefixed.
Usage notesEdit
  • The prefix non- may be joined to a word by means of a hyphen, which is standard in British usage. In many cases, especially in American usage, non- is joined without a hyphen. (For example, nonbaseball is relatively common, but noncricket — referring to a primarily British sport — is rare.) Some non- words rarely or never use a hyphen (such as nonentity). By contrast, un- is almost always spelled without a hyphen.
  • Unlike un-, non- tends to suggest an absolute negation without the possibility of shades of comparison. For example, very unhelpful is common, but very nonhelpful is not.
  • Meaning "not" in phrases taken from Latin and some other languages, non is a separate word and is not hyphenated. Examples: non compos mentis, persona non grata.
  • As non- is a living prefix, the list of words having the prefix non- is practically unlimited. It is particularly common in the sciences.
  • Non- may be attached to nouns, verbs, adjectives or adverbs to negate their meaning.
Derived termsEdit
Related termsEdit
TranslationsEdit

Etymology 2Edit

From Latin nona (nine).

PronunciationEdit

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PrefixEdit

non-

  1. prevocalic form of nona-
Derived termsEdit

DutchEdit

PronunciationEdit

PrefixEdit

non-

  1. (organic chemistry) non-

Derived termsEdit

See alsoEdit