Last modified on 26 August 2014, at 12:27

sober

See also: sõber

EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old French sobre, from Latin sōbrius (without wine), from se- (without) + ebrius (intoxicated), of unknown origin.

PronunciationEdit

AdjectiveEdit

sober (comparative soberer, superlative soberest)

  1. not drunk; not intoxicated
  2. not given to excessive drinking of alcohol
    • Book of Common Prayer
      a godly, righteous, and sober life, to the glory of Thy holy name
  3. moderate; realistic; serious; not playful; not passionate; cool; self-controlled
    • Dryden
      No sober man would put himself into danger for the applause of escaping without breaking his neck.
    • 2005, Plato, Sophist. Translation by Lesley Brown. 230d.
      Which is the finest and soberest state possible.
  4. dull; not bright or colorful
    • Milton
      Twilight grey / Had in her sober livery all things clad.
  5. subdued; solemn; grave
    • Prior
      What parts gay France from sober Spain?
    • Alexander Pope
      See her sober over a sampler, or gay over a jointed baby.

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VerbEdit

sober (third-person singular simple present sobers, present participle sobering, simple past and past participle sobered)

  1. (often with up) To make or become sober.
    • Alexander Pope
      There shallow draughts intoxicate the brain, / And drinking largely sobers us again.
  2. (often with up) To overcome or lose a state of intoxication.
    It took him hours to sober up.

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DanishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From French sobre, from Latin sobrius.

AdjectiveEdit

sober (neuter sobert, definite and plural sobre, comparative sobrere, superlative sobrest)

  1. sober (in character; moderate; realistic; serious)

DutchEdit

PronunciationEdit

AdjectiveEdit

sober (comparative soberder, superlative soberst)

  1. simple, plain, austere

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