See also: vést

EnglishEdit

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EtymologyEdit

From French veste (a vest, jacket), from Latin vestis (a garment, gown, robe, vestment, clothing, vesture).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

vest (plural vests)

  1. (now rare) A loose robe or outer garment worn historically by men in Arabic or Middle Eastern countries.
  2. (now North America) A sleeveless garment that buttons down the front, worn over a shirt, and often as part of a suit; a waistcoat.
    • 1913, Joseph C. Lincoln, chapter 10, Mr. Pratt's Patients:
      The Jones man was looking at her hard. Now he reached into the hatch of his vest and fetched out a couple of cigars, everlasting big ones, with gilt bands on them.
  3. (UK) A sleeveless garment, often with a low-cut neck, usually worn under a shirt or blouse.
  4. A sleeveless top, typically with identifying colours or logos, worn by an athlete or member of a sports team.
  5. Any sleeveless outer garment, often for a purpose such as identification, safety, or storage.
    • 2010, Thomas Mullen, The Many Deaths of the Firefly Brothers, Random House, ISBN 9781400067534, page 162:
      He gripped some of the shreds and pulled off his vest and the shirt beneath it, his clothing disintegrating around him. What in the hell point was there in wearing a twenty-five-pound bulletproof vest if you could still get gunned to death?
  6. A vestment.
    • John Dryden (1631-1700)
      In state attended by her maiden train, / Who bore the vests that holy rites require.
  7. Clothing generally; array; garb.
    • William Wordsworth (1770-1850)
      Not seldom clothed in radiant vest / Deceitfully goes forth the morn.

SynonymsEdit

HyponymsEdit

  • (sleeveless outergarment): safety vest, scrimmage vest, fishing vest

Derived termsEdit

TranslationsEdit

The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Help:How to check translations.

VerbEdit

vest (third-person singular simple present vests, present participle vesting, simple past and past participle vested)

  1. To clothe with, or as with, a vestment, or garment; to dress; to robe; to cover, surround, or encompass closely.
    • Milton
      Came vested all in white, pure as her mind.
    • Dryden
      With ether vested, and a purple sky.
  2. To clothe with authority, power, etc.; to put in possession; to invest; to furnish; to endow; followed by with and the thing conferred.
    to vest a court with power to try cases of life and death
    • Prior
      Had I been vested with the monarch's power.
  3. To place or give into the possession or discretion of some person or authority; to commit to another; with in before the possessor.
    The power of life and death is vested in the king, or in the courts.
    • John Locke
      Empire and dominion was [were] vested in him.
  4. (obsolete) To invest; to put.
    to vest money in goods, land, or houses
  5. (law) To clothe with possession; also, to give a person an immediate fixed right of present or future enjoyment of.
    to vest a person with an estate
    an estate is vested in possession
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Bouvier to this entry?)
  6. (commonly used of financial arrangements) To become vested, to become permanent.
    My pension vests at the end of the month and then I can take it with me when I quit.
    • 2005, Kaye A. Thomas, Consider Your Options, page 104
      If you doubt that you'll stick around at the company long enough for your options to vest, you should discount the value for that uncertainty as well.
    • 2007, Ransey Guy Cole, Jr. (United States Court of Appeals, Sixth Circuit), Roger Miller Music, Inc. v. Sony ATV Publishing, LLC
      Sony interpreted 17 U.S.C. § 304 as requiring that the author be alive at the start of the copyright renewal term for the author’s prior assignments to vest.

External linksEdit

AnagramsEdit


DanishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old Norse vestr, from Proto-Germanic *westą.

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /vɛst/, [ʋɛsd̥]

NounEdit

vest (uncountable)

  1. west, a compass direction

Related termsEdit

NounEdit

vest c (singular definite vesten, plural indefinite veste)

  1. vest

InflectionEdit


DutchEdit

PronunciationEdit

Etymology 1Edit

NounEdit

vest f (plural vesten, diminutive vestje n)

  1. fortified wall, city wall
  2. moat
  3. boulevard
SynonymsEdit

Etymology 2Edit

NounEdit

vest n (plural vesten, diminutive vestje n)

  1. cardigan

LatvianEdit

VerbEdit

vest tr. or intr., 1st conj., pres. vedu, ved, ved, past vedu

  1. to lead

ConjugationEdit


NorwegianEdit

vest

EtymologyEdit

From Old Norse vestr, from Proto-Germanic *westą.

NounEdit

vest

  1. west (compass point)

AntonymsEdit


This Norwegian entry was created from the translations listed at west. It may be less reliable than other entries, and may be missing parts of speech or additional senses. Please also see vest in the Norwegian Wiktionary. This notice will be removed when the entry is checked. (more information) April 2009


RomanianEdit

EtymologyEdit

From German West.

NounEdit

vest n (uncountable)

  1. west

DeclensionEdit

SynonymsEdit

See alsoEdit


RomanschEdit

EtymologyEdit

From a Germanic language.

NounEdit

vest m

  1. west

AntonymsEdit

Derived termsEdit

Related termsEdit


Serbo-CroatianEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-Slavic *věstь, from Proto-Indo-European *weyd- (to see, know, perceive).

NounEdit

vȇst f (Cyrillic spelling ве̑ст)

  1. report, news

DeclensionEdit


SloveneEdit

NounEdit

vést f (??? please provide the genitive!, ??? please provide the nominative plural!)

  1. conscience

DeclensionEdit

This noun needs an inflection-table template.

Last modified on 10 April 2014, at 16:20