Last modified on 5 October 2014, at 17:07
See also: Est, EST, Est., -est, êst, and ēst

EnglishEdit

Alternative formsEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Middle English este, from Old English ēst (will, consent, favour, grace, liberality, munificence, bounty, kindness, love, good pleasure, harmony, liberal gifts, luxuries), from Proto-Germanic *anstiz (favour, affection), from Proto-Indo-European *ān- (to notice; face, mouth). Cognate with Icelandic ást (affection, love), Dutch gunst (favour, grace, courtesy, privilege), German Gunst (favour, goodwill, boon), Danish yndest (favour), Swedish ynnest (favour, indulgence, grace). More at own.

NounEdit

est (usually uncountable, plural ests)

  1. (obsolete) Grace; favour.

Etymology 2Edit

AdjectiveEdit

est (not comparable)

  1. Abbreviation of established.
    • 2010, Julie Turjoman, Brave New Knits (page 49)
      Work sleeve, sl raglan marker, work in ribbing as est to cable marker

Etymology 3Edit

Initialism.

NounEdit

est (uncountable)

  1. Erhard Seminars Training, a course intended to promote satisfaction with life in the present moment, as opposed to strivings to attain it.

AnagramsEdit


CatalanEdit

NounEdit

est m (uncountable)

  1. east
    a l'est del país
    in the east of the country

See alsoEdit

Cardinal directions (punt cardinal):

NO N NE
O Compass rose simple plain.svg E
SO S SE
n-occ sept n-or
occ Compass rose simple plain.svg or
s-occ mer s-or

FrenchEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Old French, from Old English ēast.

PronunciationEdit

AdjectiveEdit

est (invariable)

  1. east

NounEdit

est m (plural est)

  1. east

Etymology 2Edit

From Latin est, ultimately from Proto-Indo-European *h₁ésti.

PronunciationEdit

VerbEdit

est

  1. third-person singular present indicative of être
Derived termsEdit

AnagramsEdit

External linksEdit


GuernésiaisEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old French, from Old English ēast.

NounEdit

est m (usually uncountable)

  1. east

HungarianEdit

EtymologyEdit

From the word esik.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

est (plural estek)

  1. evening, eve
  2. recital, party

DeclensionEdit

SynonymsEdit

Derived termsEdit


ItalianEdit

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

est m (invariable)

  1. east

SynonymsEdit

See alsoEdit

AnagramsEdit


LatinEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Proto-Indo-European *h₁ésti. Cognate with Sanskrit अस्ति (ásti), Ancient Greek ἐστί (estí), Old Persian 𐎠𐎿𐎫𐎡𐎹 (astiy), Hittite 𒂊𒌍𒍣 (ēszi), Old Church Slavonic єстъ (estŭ), Gothic 𐌹𐍃𐍄 (ist).

PronunciationEdit

VerbEdit

est

  1. third-person singular present active indicative of sum
    Marcus agricola est. ― "Marcus is a farmer."
    Est senex. ― "He is old."
    Est puella in vīllā. ― "There is a girl in the villa."
QuotationsEdit
Derived termsEdit

Etymology 2Edit

Form of the verb edō (I eat). Cognate with Russian есть (jestʹ).

VerbEdit

ēst

  1. third-person singular present active indicative of edō
SynonymsEdit

Middle FrenchEdit

VerbEdit

est

  1. third-person singular present indicative of estre

Old EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-Germanic *anstiz (grace, thanks), derivative of Proto-Germanic *unnaną (to grant, thank), from Proto-Indo-European *ān- (to notice; face, mouth). Cognate with Old Saxon anst (grace, favour), Old High German anst (goodwill, benevolence, thanks, grace), Gothic 𐌰𐌽𐍃𐍄𐍃 (ansts, joy, grace, thankfulness). Related to Old English unnan (to grant, allow). More at own.

NounEdit

ēst m, f

  1. consent, grace, favor; kindness
  2. pleasure

DeclensionEdit

Masculine
Feminine

SynonymsEdit


RomanianEdit

EtymologyEdit

From French est.

NounEdit

est n (uncountable)

  1. east

DeclensionEdit

SynonymsEdit

See alsoEdit


SwedishEdit

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

est c

  1. Estonian; a person from Estonia

DeclensionEdit

See alsoEdit


WelshEdit

PronunciationEdit

VerbEdit

est

  1. (colloquial) second-person singular past of mynd

SynonymsEdit