AramaicEdit

Etymology 1Edit

PronounEdit

אַתְּ (ʾattm sg (plural אַתּוּן(ʾattūn), feminine אַתִּי(ʾattī) or אַתְּ (ʾatt), feminine plural אַתֵּין(ʾattēn))

  1. Alternative form of אַנְתְּ(ʾant)

Etymology 2Edit

PronounEdit

אַתְּ (ʾattf sg

  1. feminine singular of אַתְּ (ʾatt)

HebrewEdit

Etymology 1Edit

Related to Phoenician 𐤀𐤉𐤕(ʾyt), Punic 𐤀𐤕(ʾt), and Aramaic ית‎.

PronunciationEdit

PrepositionEdit

אֵת, אֶת־ (et, et-)

  1. Used to change objects to the accusative case.
    • Genesis 1:1, with translation of the Jewish Publication Society:
      בְּרֵאשִׁ֖ית בָּרָ֣א אֱלֹהִ֑ים אֵ֥ת הַשָּׁמַ֖יִם וְאֵ֥ת הָאָֽרֶץ:‎‎
      bereshit bara Elohim et hashamayim ve'et ha'aretz.
      In the beginning God created the heaven and the earth.
    • Deuteronomy 6:5, with translation of the Jewish Publication Society:
      וְאָ֣הַבְתָּ֔ אֵ֖ת יְהֹוָ֣ה אֱלֹהֶ֑יךָ בְּכָל־לְבָֽבְךָ֥ וּבְכָל־נַפְשְׁךָ֖ וּבְכָל־מְאֹדֶֽךָ:‎‎
      veahávta et adonái elohéycha b'chól levavechá ub'chól nafshechá ub'chól meodécha
      And thou shalt love the Lord thy God with all thy heart, and with all thy soul, and with all thy might.
    • 1994, The Lion King, spoken by Scar (Eli Gorenstein):
      אני הרגתי את מופסה!‎‎
      Aní harágti et Mufása!
      I killed Mufasa!
    • 2019 October 31, Naomi Niddam, Local Call[1]:
      את ספרו החשוב הראשון פירסם בישראל בשנות ה-70, ובחר לכתוב אותו בערבית ספרותית
      He published his first important book in Israel in the 70s, and chose to write it in Literary Arabic.

Usage notesEdit

  • In the event of a semantically indefinite direct object, את is not used; no other preposition is used instead. את is only used in definite usage - when the direct object is a proper noun (which is definite in Hebrew), or a personal pronoun (in which case it is incorporated into the form of את), or a noun phrase beginning with ה־(ha-, the), or a noun phrase headed by a noun compound ending in one of these.

InflectionEdit

Further readingEdit

H853 in Strong, James (1979) Strong’s Exhaustive Concordance to the Bible

Etymology 2Edit

Cognate with Akkadian 𒀉𒋾 (itti, with).

PronunciationEdit

PrepositionEdit

אֵת, אֶת־ (et, et-) [pattern: קֵטֶל]

  1. (archaic) To, with.
    • 2015 September 29, Ran Boker, “לונדון את קירשנבאום תשודר כמו בימי חייו של מוטי (London et Kirschenbaum will be broadcasted like [the way it was] in the lifetime of Moti)”, in ynet:
    • Genesis 39:2, with translation of the King James Version:
      וַיְהִי יְהוָה אֶת יוֹסֵף
      vayhi YHWH et Yosef
      And the Lord was with Joseph
Usage notesEdit
  • The inflected forms of the otherwise archaic sense “to” or “with” are still used, but now belong to the (suppletive) preposition עִם(im, with).
  • In modern sources, the separate use of אֵת as meaning 'with', is influenced more by Romance et. (see quote above)
InflectionEdit

Etymology 3Edit

From Proto-Semitic *ʔanti.

PronounEdit

אַתְּ (átf (Biblical Hebrew pausal form אָתְּ)

  1. You, thou: (the feminine singular second-person personal pronoun).
Usage notesEdit
  • In mishnaic sources, the masculine singular second person is inflected exactly as the feminine singular second person should be.

See alsoEdit

Etymology 4Edit

NounEdit

אֹת (otm (plural אֹתֹתor אֹתוֹת‎)

  1. (rare, Biblical Hebrew) defective spelling of אוֹת: sign.

Etymology 5Edit

NounEdit

אֵת (etm (plural indefinite אִתִּים‎, singular construct אֵת־, plural construct אִתֵּי־‎)

  1. shovel
  2. spade
Usage notesEdit

AnagramsEdit