Translingual edit

Etymology edit

Possibly from either an Abbreviation of English Estonian or Estonian eesti

Symbol edit

et

  1. (international standards) ISO 639-1 language code for Estonian.

English edit

 
English Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia

Etymology edit

From Middle English et, from Old English æt, first and third person singular indicative of Old English etan (to eat). Doublet of ate.

Pronunciation edit

  • IPA(key): /ɛt/
  • (file)
  • Rhymes: -ɛt

Verb edit

et

  1. (informal, dialectal) Pronunciation spelling of ate, the simple past and past participle of eat
    • 1896, Samuel Clemens (Mark Twain), Tom Sawyer, Detective [2]:
      So we got to talking together while he et his breakfast.
    • 1907, O. Henry, Seats of the Haughty[3]:
      'Boss,' says the cabby, 'I et a steak in that restaurant once. If you're real hungry, I advise you to try the saddle-shops first.'
    • 1919, Bess Streeter Aldrich, A Long-Distance Call From Jim[4]:
      Well, I don't care if he does! I can remember the time when he et a good old-fashioned supper.
    • 1937, J. R. R. Tolkien, The Hobbit:
      Yer can't expect folk to stop here for ever just to be et by you and Bert.
    • 1946 February 18, Life magazine:
      It must have been somethin’ I et!
    • 1996, Dana Lyons, Cows with Guns:
      They eat to grow, grow to die / Die to be et at the hamburger fry.
    • 2001, Richard Williams, The Animator's Survival Kit, page 220:
      Something I et?

Anagrams edit

Albanian edit

Alternative forms edit

Etymology edit

Uncertain. Attested as "het" in Bogdani. Possibly from Proto-Indo-European *i̯et (to set out for; to strive). Compare Old Irish ét (thirst), Irish éad (eagerness, jealousy), Latin sitis (thirst), Tocharian A yat (reach, get). Alternatively from Proto-Indo-European *eus-ti-, cognate to Greek αἰτέω (aitéō, to demand, to beg). Orel suggests Proto-Albanian *alk-ti-, drawing comparisons to Lithuanian álkti (to be hungry), Proto-Slavic *olkati (id.), and Old High German ilgi (hunger).[1]

Noun edit

et f (plural etje, definite etja, definite plural etjet)

  1. thirst

References edit

  1. ^ Orel, Vladimir E. (2000) A concise historical grammar of the Albanian language: reconstruction of Proto-Albanian[1], Leiden, Boston, Köln: Brill, →ISBN, page 155

Catalan edit

Etymology edit

Inherited from Latin (accusative of ).

Pronunciation edit

Pronoun edit

et (proclitic, contracted t', enclitic te, contracted enclitic 't)

  1. you, thee (singular, direct or indirect object)

Usage notes edit

  • et is the reinforced (reforçada) form of the pronoun. It is used before verbs beginning with a consonant.
    Et perdràs.You'll get lost.

Declension edit

Related terms edit

Chuukese edit

Numeral edit

et

  1. (serial counting) one

Cimbrian edit

Etymology edit

From Middle High German iezuo, ieze, iezō, from Old High German iozou, perhaps from Proto-Germanic *juta. Cognate with German itzo (modern jetzt), English yet.

Adverb edit

et

  1. (Sette Comuni) now
    Et lóofet dar hunt et dar haazo.
    Now the dog runs, and now the hare.

Related terms edit

References edit

  • “et” in Martalar, Umberto Martello; Bellotto, Alfonso (1974) Dizionario della lingua Cimbra dei Sette Communi vicentini, 1st edition, Roana, Italy: Instituto di Cultura Cimbra A. Dal Pozzo

Crimean Tatar edit

Etymology edit

From Proto-Turkic *et.

Noun edit

et

  1. meat

Declension edit

References edit

Danish edit

Etymology edit

From Old Norse eitt.

Pronunciation edit

Article edit

et (common en)

  1. (neuter) a, an

Emilian edit

Etymology edit

From Latin (you).

Pronunciation edit

  • IPA(key): /et/
  • Hyphenation: et

Pronoun edit

et (personal, nominative case)

  1. you (singular)

Alternative forms edit

  • Becomes t- before a vowel.
  • Becomes -et when acting as an enclitic (after a consonant).
  • Becomes -t when acting as an enclitic (after a vowel).

Related terms edit

Estonian edit

Etymology edit

From Proto-Finnic *että (compare Finnish että), from the same Proto-Uralic root *e- (this) as Hungarian ez.

Conjunction edit

et

  1. that
    Ma tean, et sa oled julm.
    I know that you are cruel.
  2. to, in order to, so that, as to
    Ma sõitsin poodi, et viina osta.
    I drove to the store to buy vodka.

Faroese edit

Pronunciation edit

Verb edit

et

  1. singular imperative of eta

Anagrams edit

Finnish edit

Pronunciation edit

  • IPA(key): /ˈet/, [ˈe̞t̪]
  • Rhymes: -et
  • Syllabification(key): et

Etymology 1 edit

See the etymology of the corresponding lemma form.

Verb edit

et

  1. second-person singular indicative of ei
  2. (colloquial, Uusimaa) Alternative form of etkö.

Etymology 2 edit

Shortened form of että.

Conjunction edit

et (colloquial)

  1. (subordinating) That.
Synonyms edit

Etymology 3 edit

Borrowed from Latin et (and).

Conjunction edit

et

  1. (coordinating) And, especially as symbolized by an ampersand.

Anagrams edit

French edit

Etymology edit

Inherited from Middle French et, from Old French et, from Latin et.

Pronunciation edit

Conjunction edit

et

  1. and

Usage notes edit

  • et is never subject to liaison with a following word, i.e. the t is never pronounced.

Descendants edit

  • Mauritian Creole: e, ek
  • English: et

Further reading edit

Anagrams edit

Ingrian edit

Pronunciation edit

Verb edit

et

  1. second-person singular present of ei
    • 1936, N. A. Iljin and V. I. Junus, Bukvari iƶoroin șkouluja vart, Leningrad: Riikin Ucebno-pedagogiceskoi Izdateljstva, page 32:
      Makkaa aina yksintää, siis et noise läsimää.
      Always sleep alone, so you don't get ill.

References edit

  • V. I. Junus (1936) Iƶoran Keelen Grammatikka[5], Leningrad: Riikin Ucebno-pedagogiceskoi Izdateljstva, page 128
  • Olga I. Konkova; Nikita A. Dyachkov (2014) Inkeroin Keel: Пособие по Ижорскому Языку[6], →ISBN, page 95

Italian edit

Etymology edit

From Latin et (and; plus).

Pronunciation edit

  • (before consonants) IPA(key): /e/*
  • (before vowels) IPA(key): /e.t‿/

Conjunction edit

et

  1. (archaic, poetic) Alternative form of e

Further reading edit

Anagrams edit

Latin edit

Alternative forms edit

Etymology edit

From Proto-Italic *et, from Proto-Indo-European *éti or Proto-Indo-European *h₁eti.

Cognate with Ancient Greek ἔτι (éti), Sanskrit अति (ati), Gothic 𐌹𐌸 (, and, but, however, yet), Old English prefix ed- (re-). More at ed-.

Pronunciation edit

Conjunction edit

et

  1. and
  2. (mathematics) plus
    Duo et duo sunt quattuor.
    Two plus two equals four.
  3. (literary) though, even if

Usage notes edit

  • When used in pairs, et...et may function like English both...and.

Quotations edit

Synonyms edit

Derived terms edit

Descendants edit

  • Balkan Romance:
    • Aromanian: e
    • Romanian: e
  • Dalmatian:
  • Italo-Romance:
    • Corsican: e
    • Italian: e, ed
    • Judeo-Italian: ⁧אֵי(e)
    • Neapolitan: e
    • Sicilian: e
  • Padanian:
    • Gallo-Italic:
      • Emilian: e
      • Ligurian: e
      • Piedmontese: e
      • Romagnol: e
    • Friulian: e
    • Istriot: e
    • Ladin: y
    • Romansch: e, ed
    • Venetian: e
  • Gallo-Romance:
    • Catalan: i
    • Franco-Provençal: et, e
    • Old French: et, e
      • Middle French: et
        • French: et
          • Mauritian Creole: e, ek
          • English: et
      • Norman: et
      • Picard: et
      • Walloon: et, eyet
    • Old Occitan: e
      • Occitan: e
  • Ibero-Romance:
    • Aragonese: y
    • Mozarabic: ⁧א(ʔ)
    • Old Leonese: [Term?]
      • Asturian: y, ya
      • Extremaduran: i
      • Leonese: y
      • Mirandese: i
    • Old Galician-Portuguese: e (see there for further descendants)
    • Old Spanish: é (see there for further descendants)
  • Insular Romance:
    • Sardinian: e

See also edit

Adverb edit

et (not comparable)

  1. also, too, besides, or likewise
    Synonym: quoque
    • 44 BCE, Cicero, De Officiis 1.133:
      Nihil fuit in Catulīs, ut eōs exquisitō iūdiciō putārēs utī litterārum, quamquam erant litteratī; sed et aliī.

References edit

  • et in Charlton T. Lewis and Charles Short (1879) A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press
  • et in Charlton T. Lewis (1891) An Elementary Latin Dictionary, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • et in Charles du Fresne du Cange’s Glossarium Mediæ et Infimæ Latinitatis (augmented edition with additions by D. P. Carpenterius, Adelungius and others, edited by Léopold Favre, 1883–1887)

Livvi edit

Pronunciation edit

Verb edit

et

  1. second-person singular indicative of ei

References edit

  • N. Gilojeva; S. Rudakova (2009) Karjalan kielen Livvin murdehen algukursu [Beginners' course of Karelian language's Livvi dialect]‎[7] (in Livvi), Petrozavodsk, →ISBN, page 20
  • Olga Žarinova (2012) Pagizemmo Karjalakse [Let's speak Karelian], St Petersburg, →ISBN, page 142
  • Tatjana Boiko (2019), “ei”, in Suuri Karjal-Venʹalaine Sanakniigu (livvin murreh) [The Big Karelian-Russian dictionary (Livvi dialect)], 2nd edition, →ISBN, page 38

Luxembourgish edit

Etymology edit

From Proto-Germanic *hit. Cognate with German es, English it, Dutch het.

Pronunciation edit

Pronoun edit

et

  1. Reduced form of hatt (she, her; it)

Declension edit

Middle Dutch edit

Pronunciation edit

Pronoun edit

et

  1. Alternative form of het

Middle French edit

Etymology edit

From Old French et.

Conjunction edit

et

  1. and

Descendants edit

  • French: et
    • Mauritian Creole: e, ek
    • English: et

Middle Low German edit

Pronunciation edit

Pronoun edit

et

  1. Alternative form of it.

Declension edit

Norman edit

Etymology edit

From Old French et, from Latin et.

Pronunciation edit

  • (file)

Conjunction edit

et

  1. (Jersey) and
    • 2013 March, Geraint Jennings, “Mar martello”, in The Town Crier[8], archived from the original on 13 March 2016, page 20:
      Dans les clios étout nou vait des tracteurs et des machinnes tandi qu'lé travas du fèrmyi r'prend san rhythme coumme tréjous.
      In the fields tractors and machines can be seen too as farm work picks up again as always.

Noun edit

et m (plural ets)

  1. (Jersey) ampersand

Synonyms edit

Norwegian Bokmål edit

Etymology 1 edit

From Old Norse eitt, the nominative and accusative form of einn. The indefinite article was not used in Old Norse and was likely an influence from other Germanic languages.

Pronunciation edit

Article edit

et n (neuter indefinite article used with neuter nouns)

  1. a, an (the neuter indefinite article)
Related terms edit
  • ei (feminine indefinite article)
  • en (masculine indefinite article)
  • ett (neuter form of cardinal number)

See also edit

  • eit (Nynorsk) (neuter indefinite article)

Etymology 2 edit

Pronunciation edit

Verb edit

et

  1. imperative of ete

References edit

Norwegian Nynorsk edit

Verb edit

et

  1. inflection of eta:
    1. present
    2. imperative

Old French edit

Alternative forms edit

Etymology edit

From Latin et.

Pronunciation edit

  • IPA(key): /e/
    • The t in this word is merely an adoption of the Latin spelling and was never actually pronounced in Old French, except in the earliest texts, where it is pronounced before a vowel-initial word.

Conjunction edit

et

  1. and

Descendants edit

  • Middle French: et
    • French: et
      • Mauritian Creole: e, ek
      • English: et
  • Norman: et
  • Picard: et
  • Walloon: et, eyet

Old Norse edit

Verb edit

et

  1. inflection of eta:
    1. first-person singular present active indicative
    2. second-person singular present active imperative

Pipil edit

Etymology edit

Compare Classical Nahuatl etl (bean).

Pronunciation edit

Noun edit

et (plural ehet)

  1. bean
    Xiccohua et pal ticmanat mozta
    Buy beans to boil tomorrow

Salar edit

Etymology 1 edit

From Proto-Turkic *et. Cognate with Turkish et.

Pronunciation edit

  • (Jiezi, Gaizi, Chahandusi, Xunhua, Qinghai, Ili, Yining, Xinjiang) IPA(key): [eʰt]
  • (Ili, Yining, Xinjiang) IPA(key): [eʰtʰ]
  • (Jiezi, Gaizi, Xunhua, Qinghai) IPA(key): [æt]
  • (Jiezi, Gaizi, Qingshui, Xunhua, Qinghai) IPA(key): [et]

Noun edit

et

  1. meat, flesh

References edit

  • Tenishev, Edhem (1976), “ät, eʼt, et”, in Stroj salárskovo jazyká [Grammar of Salar], Moscow, page 300, 328
  • Ma, Chengjun; Han, Lianye; Ma, Weisheng (December 2010), “et”, in 米娜瓦尔 艾比布拉 (Minavar Abibra), editor, 撒维汉词典 (Sāwéihàncídiǎn) [Salar-Uyghur-Chinese dictionary], 1st edition, Beijing, →ISBN, page 105
  • Yakup, Abdurishid (2002), “eʰt”, in An Ili Salar Vocabulary: Introduction and a Provisional Salar-English Lexicon, Tokyo: University of Tokyo, →ISBN, page 90

Etymology 2 edit

From Proto-Turkic *ēt-, cognate with Turkish etmek.

Pronunciation edit

Verb edit

et

  1. to do, make
Related terms edit

References edit

  • Tenishev, Edhem (1976), “e‘t, e‘c, ec, eʒ‘...”, in Stroj salárskovo jazyká [Grammar of Salar], Moscow, page 328
  • 林 (Lin), 莲云 (Lianyun) (1985), “et-”, in 撒拉语简志 [A Brief History of Salar], Beijing: 民族出版社: 琴書店, →OCLC, page 24
  • Ma, Chengjun; Han, Lianye; Ma, Weisheng (December 2010), “et-”, in 米娜瓦尔 艾比布拉 (Minavar Abibra), editor, 撒维汉词典 (Sāwéihàncídiǎn) [Salar-Uyghur-Chinese dictionary], 1st edition, Beijing, →ISBN, page 106
  • 马伟 (Ma Wei), 朝克 (Chao Ke) (2016), “et-”, in 濒危语言——撒拉语研究 [Endangered Languages ​​- Salar Language Studies], 青海 (Qinghai): 国家社会科学基金项目 (National Social Science Foundation Project)

Saterland Frisian edit

Alternative forms edit

Etymology edit

From Old Frisian et, hit, from Proto-Germanic *hit. Cognates include West Frisian it and Dutch het.

Pronunciation edit

  • IPA(key): /ət/
  • Hyphenation: et

Pronoun edit

et

  1. unstressed form of dät (it)

Derived terms edit

See also edit

References edit

  • Marron C. Fort (2015), “et”, in Saterfriesisches Wörterbuch mit einer phonologischen und grammatischen Übersicht, Buske, →ISBN

Scots edit

Noun edit

et (plural ets)

  1. Shetland form of aet

References edit

Semai edit

Pronoun edit

et[1]

  1. they (3rd person plural pronoun)

Synonyms edit

See also edit

References edit

  1. ^ Basrim bin Ngah Aching (2008) Kamus Engròq Semay – Engròq Malaysia, Kamus Bahasa Semai – Bahasa Malaysia, Bangi: Institut Alam dan Tamadun Melayu, Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia

Spanish edit

Etymology edit

Borrowed from Latin et.

Pronunciation edit

  • IPA(key): /ˈet/ [ˈet̪]
  • Rhymes: -et
  • Syllabification: et

Noun edit

et m (plural ets)

  1. ampersand
    Synonym: y comercial

Further reading edit

Tok Pisin edit

Tok Pisin numbers (edit)
80
 ←  7 8 9  → 
    Cardinal: et

Etymology edit

From English eight.

Numeral edit

et

  1. eight

Usage notes edit

Used when counting; see also etpela.

Coordinate terms edit

Turkish edit

Etymology 1 edit

From Ottoman Turkishات(et, meat, flesh, pulp),[1] from Proto-Turkic *et (meat).[2]

Pronunciation edit

Noun edit

et (definite accusative eti, plural etler)

  1. The muscle and fat tissue in humans and animals; meat, flesh.
  2. The muscle tissue in animals used as food.
  3. Bare skin on body.
  4. The soft, edible part of a fruit between the skin and the core.

Declension edit

Inflection
Nominative et
Definite accusative eti
Singular Plural
Nominative et etler
Definite accusative eti etleri
Dative ete etlere
Locative ette etlerde
Ablative etten etlerden
Genitive etin etlerin
Possessive forms
Nominative
Singular Plural
1st singular etim etlerim
2nd singular etin etlerin
3rd singular eti etleri
1st plural etimiz etlerimiz
2nd plural etiniz etleriniz
3rd plural etleri etleri
Definite accusative
Singular Plural
1st singular etimi etlerimi
2nd singular etini etlerini
3rd singular etini etlerini
1st plural etimizi etlerimizi
2nd plural etinizi etlerinizi
3rd plural etlerini etlerini
Dative
Singular Plural
1st singular etime etlerime
2nd singular etine etlerine
3rd singular etine etlerine
1st plural etimize etlerimize
2nd plural etinize etlerinize
3rd plural etlerine etlerine
Locative
Singular Plural
1st singular etimde etlerimde
2nd singular etinde etlerinde
3rd singular etinde etlerinde
1st plural etimizde etlerimizde
2nd plural etinizde etlerinizde
3rd plural etlerinde etlerinde
Ablative
Singular Plural
1st singular etimden etlerimden
2nd singular etinden etlerinden
3rd singular etinden etlerinden
1st plural etimizden etlerimizden
2nd plural etinizden etlerinizden
3rd plural etlerinden etlerinden
Genitive
Singular Plural
1st singular etimin etlerimin
2nd singular etinin etlerinin
3rd singular etinin etlerinin
1st plural etimizin etlerimizin
2nd plural etinizin etlerinizin
3rd plural etlerinin etlerinin

Derived terms edit

Etymology 2 edit

Verb edit

et

  1. second-person singular imperative of etmek

References edit

  1. ^ Redhouse, James W. (1890), “ات”, in A Turkish and English Lexicon, Constantinople: A. H. Boyajian, page 17
  2. ^ Nişanyan, Sevan (2002–), “et”, in Nişanyan Sözlük

Further reading edit

  • et”, in Turkish dictionaries, Türk Dil Kurumu

Uzbek edit

Etymology edit

From Proto-Turkic *et.

Noun edit

et (plural etlar)

  1. flesh
  2. meat

Veps edit

Verb edit

et

  1. second-person plural present of ei

Walloon edit

Alternative forms edit

Etymology edit

From Old French et.

Pronunciation edit

Conjunction edit

et

  1. and

Yola edit

Conjunction edit

et

  1. Alternative form of at (that?)

References edit

  • Jacob Poole (1867), William Barnes, editor, A Glossary, With some Pieces of Verse, of the old Dialect of the English Colony in the Baronies of Forth and Bargy, County of Wexford, Ireland, London: J. Russell Smith, page 38

Zhuang edit

Etymology edit

(This etymology is missing or incomplete. Please add to it, or discuss it at the Etymology scriptorium.)

Pronunciation edit

Noun edit

et (Sawndip form 𬖋, 1957–1982 spelling et)

  1. steamed leaf-wrapped cake made of glutinous rice paste