See also: α-, ά-, and ἁ-

Contents

Ancient GreekEdit

PronunciationEdit

 

Etymology 1Edit

From Proto-Hellenic *ə-, from Proto-Indo-European *n̥-. The form ἀν- ‎(an-) appears when followed by laryngeal and a vowel: that is, in an open syllable of the n̥HV- form. Akin to νη- ‎(nē-), νᾱ- ‎(nā-) and νω- ‎(nō-), which are closed-syllable reflexes of the n̥h₁C-, n̥h₂C-, n̥h₃C- forms, respectively.

Cognate with Old English and English un-, Latin in-, Sanskrit अ- ‎(a-), Old Irish in- and an-.

Alternative formsEdit

  • ἀν- ‎(an-) before vowels
  • νη- ‎(nē-), νᾱ- ‎(nā-), νω- ‎(nō-) before Proto-Indo-European laryngeal and consonant

PrefixEdit

ᾰ̓- ‎(a-)

  1. The alpha privativum, used to make words that have a sense opposite to the word (or stem) to which the prefix is attached. It is also known as privative a and alpha privative.
Usage notesEdit

The alpha is usually short, but long when added to a stem that begins with three short syllables. Thus, words such as ἀ-δάματος ‎(a-dámatos)) begin with long alpha in Epic, and frequently also in Lyric, Tragic, or Comic poetry. ἀθάνατος ‎(athánatos) and all its compounds always have long alpha.

Derived termsEdit


DescendantsEdit

Etymology 2Edit

PrefixEdit

ᾰ̓- ‎(a-)

  1. Alternative form of ἁ- ‎(ha-)

Etymology 3Edit

This entry lacks etymological information. If you are familiar with the origin of this term, please add it to the page per etymology instructions. You can also discuss it at the Etymology Scriptorium.

PrefixEdit

ᾰ̓- ‎(a-)

  1. The alpha intensivum, used to strengthen the force of compounds.

Etymology 4Edit

This entry lacks etymological information. If you are familiar with the origin of this term, please add it to the page per etymology instructions. You can also discuss it at the Etymology Scriptorium.

PrefixEdit

ᾰ̓- ‎(a-)

  1. The alpha euphonicum, used to soften pronunciation before two consonants.

ReferencesEdit

  • Beekes, Robert S. P. (2010) Etymological Dictionary of Greek (Leiden Indo-European Etymological Dictionary Series; 10), volume I, with the assistance of Lucien van Beek, Leiden, Boston: Brill, page 1
Read in another language