ἀ-

See also: α-, ά-, and ἁ-

Contents

Ancient GreekEdit

PronunciationEdit

 

Etymology 1Edit

From Proto-Indo-European *n̥- ‎(not, un-) when followed by a consonant. The form ἀν- ‎(an-) appears when followed by laryngeal and a vowel: that is, in an open syllable of the n̥HV- form. Akin to νη- ‎(nē-), νᾱ- ‎(nā-) and νω- ‎(nō-), which are closed-syllable reflexes of the n̥h₁C-, n̥h₂C-, n̥h₃C- forms, respectively.

Cognate with Old English and English un-, Latin in-, Sanskrit अ- ‎(a-), Old Irish in- and an-.

Alternative formsEdit

  • ἀν- ‎(an-) before vowels
  • νη- ‎(nē-), νᾱ- ‎(nā-), νω- ‎(nō-) before Proto-Indo-European laryngeal and consonant

PrefixEdit

ᾰ̓- ‎(a-)

  1. The alpha privativum, used to make words that have a sense opposite to the word (or stem) to which the prefix is attached. It is also known as privative a and alpha privative.
Usage notesEdit

The alpha is usually short, but long when added to a stem that begins with three short syllables. Thus, words such as ἀ-δάματος ‎(a-dámatos)) begin with long alpha in Epic, and frequently also in Lyric, Tragic, or Comic poetry. ἀθάνατος ‎(athánatos) and all its compounds always have long alpha.

Derived formsEdit


DescendantsEdit

Etymology 2Edit

Alternative formsEdit

  • ἀ- ‎(a-), ὀ- ‎(o-)

PrefixEdit

ᾰ̓- ‎(a-)

  1. Alternative form of ἁ- ‎(ha-)

Etymology 3Edit

PrefixEdit

ᾰ̓- ‎(a-)

  1. The alpha intensivum, used to strengthen the force of compounds.

Etymology 4Edit

PrefixEdit

ᾰ̓- ‎(a-)

  1. The alpha euphonicum, used to soften pronunciation before two consonants.

ReferencesEdit

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