an-

EnglishEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Middle English an-, from Old English an-, on- ‎(on-), from Proto-Germanic *ana ‎(on). More at on.

Alternative formsEdit

PrefixEdit

an-

  1. A prefix of Anglo-Saxon origin, the same as on-.
    ancome, aneal, anent

Etymology 2Edit

From Middle English an-, and-, from Old English and-, ond- ‎(and-, back, against). More at and-.

PrefixEdit

an-

  1. A prefix of Anglo-Saxon origin, a reduced form of and-.
    answer

Etymology 3Edit

From Ancient Greek ἀν- ‎(an-).

PrefixEdit

an-

  1. not; used to make words that have a sense opposite to the word (or stem) to which the prefix is attached. Used with stems that begin with vowels and "h".
Related termsEdit
Derived termsEdit

See alsoEdit


Classical NahuatlEdit

Alternative formsEdit

  • am- (when followed by a vowel or a consonant which is labial)

PrefixEdit

an-

  1. Subject prefix for verbs; it indicates that the subject is second-person plural; you, you all.

DutchEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Ancient Greek ἀ- ‎(a-) (ἀν- ‎(an-) immediately preceding a vowel).

PronunciationEdit

PrefixEdit

an-

  1. an-: Not, without, opposite of.

Derived termsEdit



GermanEdit

PronunciationEdit

PrefixEdit

an-

  1. Separable verb prefix, on
  2. Separable verb prefix, up

SynonymsEdit

AntonymsEdit

Derived termsEdit

See alsoEdit


IdoEdit

EtymologyEdit

From an ‎(at, on)

PrefixEdit

an-

  1. at, on

Derived termsEdit



IrishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old Irish an-, in-, from Proto-Celtic *an-, from Proto-Indo-European *n̥-.

PronunciationEdit

Prefix 1Edit

an-

  1. (with adjectives) very
  2. (with nouns) great

Prefix 2Edit

an-

  1. in-, un-, not
  2. bad, unnatural
  3. over-, excessive, intense

Alternative formsEdit

  • ain- (used before slender vowels and consonants)

Usage notesEdit

Triggers lenition of a following b, c, f, g, m, p. In Munster, used only before a vowel.

  • anbheag‎ ― very small
  • andeas‎ ― very nice

Derived termsEdit


Related termsEdit

  • ana- (form used before consonants in Munster)

MutationEdit

Irish mutation
Radical Eclipsis with h-prothesis with t-prothesis
an- n-an- han- t-an-
Note: Some of these forms may be hypothetical. Not every
possible mutated form of every word actually occurs.

ReferencesEdit


LuxembourgishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From the preposition an, from Proto-Germanic *in. Compare German ein-, English in-.

PronunciationEdit

PrefixEdit

an-

  1. in- (indicates physical or metaphorical motion into something)

Usage notesEdit

  • When attached to a verb stem beginning with a consonant sound other than /d/, /h/, /n/, /t/ or /t͡s/, the prefix becomes a- as a result of the Eifeler Regel.

Derived termsEdit


AntonymsEdit


MalagasyEdit

PrefixEdit

an-

  1. prefix element of an- -ana

See alsoEdit


Middle WelshEdit

Old EnglishEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From ān ‎(one).

PrefixEdit

ān-

  1. one, uni-, only
    āncyn ‎(only, unique)
  2. sole, single, solitary
    ānbūend ‎(hermit)
    ānġilde ‎(single payment)

Old FrenchEdit

PrefixEdit

an-

  1. Alternative form of en-

PaliEdit

Alternative FormsEdit

PrefixEdit

an-

  1. Alternative form of a- used before words beginning with vowels

Derived TermsEdit


ReferencesEdit

  • an- in Pali Text Society (1921–1925), Pali-English Dictionary, London: Chipstead. (licensed under CC-BY-NC)

PipilEdit

PronunciationEdit

PrefixEdit

an-

  1. (personal) you, second-person plural subject marker.
    Antekitit tik ne mil?
    Do you work at the cornfield?

Usage notesEdit

  • Before a vowel, an- changes to anh-. The digraph ⟨nh⟩ is pronounced as [ŋ]. Example:
Anhajsiket peyna.
You came early.

See alsoEdit


Scottish GaelicEdit

Alternative formsEdit

PrefixEdit

an-

  1. un-, anti-
  2. bad, unnatural

Derived termsEdit

Related termsEdit

PrefixEdit

an-

  1. Used to emphasise the root.

Derived termsEdit


WelshEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Middle Welsh an-, from Proto-Celtic *an-, from Proto-Indo-European *n̥-.

PrefixEdit

an-

  1. un-, not, anti-

Usage notesEdit

Triggers the nasal mutation, sometimes with accompanying euphonic or orthographic adjustments.

Derived termsEdit

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