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Ancient GreekEdit

EtymologyEdit

Μost probably a derivation of Ἑλλοί (Helloí) or Σελλοί (Selloí), the Greek inhabitants of the area around the sanctuary of Dodona (Δωδώνη (Dōdṓnē)), itself of Pre-Greek Pre-Indo-European origin according to Beekes.[1]

PronunciationEdit

 

NounEdit

 
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Ἕλλην (Héllēnm (genitive Ἕλληνος); third declension

  1. Greek, one who is from Greece or speaks Greek.
    • 386 BCE – 367 BCE, Plato, Meno 82b:
      Σωκράτης: Ἕλλην μέν ἐστι καὶ ἑλληνίζει;
      Μένων: πάνυ γε σφόδρα, οἰκογενής γε.
      Sōkrátēs: Héllēn mén esti kaì hellēnízei?
      Ménōn: pánu ge sphódra, oikogenḗs ge.
      Socrates: He is a Greek, I suppose, and speaks Greek?
      Meno: Very much so, in fact home-bred.
  2. one who participates in Greek culture.
  3. often used in Jewish and Christian literature as referring to any non-Jew: gentile
  4. pagan

DeclensionEdit

Proper nounEdit

 
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Ἕλλην (Héllēnm (genitive Ἕλληνος); third declension

  1. Hellen, the mythical patriarch of the Greeks.

DeclensionEdit

Derived termsEdit

Related termsEdit

DescendantsEdit

  • English: Hellen (proper noun); Hellene (noun)
  • Greek: Έλλην (Éllin)
  • Latin: Hellēn

Further readingEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ Beekes, Robert S. P. (2010) Etymological Dictionary of Greek (Leiden Indo-European Etymological Dictionary Series; 10), with the assistance of Lucien van Beek, Leiden, Boston: Brill, →ISBN

GreekEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Ancient Greek Ἕλλην (Héllēn)

NounEdit

Ἕλλην (Ἕllinm (plural Ἕλληνες)

  1. Katharevousa form of Έλληνας (Éllinas, Greek man)