See also: Pagan, págán, and păgân

English edit

Etymology edit

From Middle English pagan (adjective and noun), from Latin pāgānus (rural, rustic", later "civilian), replaced Middle English payen from the same root. The meaning "not (Judeo-)Christian" arose in Vulgar Latin, probably from the 4th century.[1] It is unclear whether this usage is derived primarily from the "rustic" or from the "civilian" meaning, which in Roman army jargon meant 'clumsy'. As a self-designation of neopagans, attested since 1990.

Partly displaced native heathen, from Old English hǣþen.

Pronunciation edit

  • enPR: pā'gən, IPA(key): /ˈpeɪɡən/
  • (file)
  • Rhymes: -eɪɡən

Adjective edit

pagan (not comparable)

  1. Relating to, characteristic of religions that differ from main world religions.
    Under Christianization, many converted societies transformed their pagan deities into saints.
  2. (by extension, derogatory) Savage, immoral, uncivilized, wild.

Usage notes edit

  • When referring to modern paganism, the term is now often capitalized, like other terms referring to religions.

Synonyms edit

Antonyms edit

  • (religion):

Hyponyms edit

Derived terms edit

Translations edit

The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables. See instructions at Wiktionary:Entry layout § Translations.

Noun edit

pagan (plural pagans)

  1. A person not adhering to a main world religion; a follower of a pantheistic or nature-worshipping religion.
    This community has a surprising number of pagans.
  2. (by extension, derogatory) An uncivilized or unsocialized person.
  3. (by extension, derogatory) An unruly, badly educated child.

Synonyms edit

Derived terms edit

Related terms edit

Translations edit

The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables. See instructions at Wiktionary:Entry layout § Translations.

See also edit

References edit

  1. ^ Augustine, Divers. Quaest. 83.

Anagrams edit

Asturian edit

Verb edit

pagan

  1. third-person plural present subjunctive of pagar

Cebuano edit

Pronunciation edit

  • Hyphenation: pa‧gan

Verb edit

pagan

  1. to embroil; to draw into a situation; to cause to be involved
  2. to implicate; to connect or involve in an unfavorable or criminal way with something
  3. to fall victim to a friendly fire
  4. (military) to fall victim as collateral damage
  5. to be hit by a stray bullet
  6. to get caught in a crossfire
  7. (games, of marbles) to hit the adjacent marble with the target marble

Quotations edit

For quotations using this term, see Citations:pagan.

Estonian edit

Etymology edit

Ultimately from Latin paganus, through either Old East Slavic поганъ (poganŭ) or directly from Latin, through the German crusaders. Cognate to Finnish pakana.

Noun edit

pagan (genitive pagana, partitive paganat)

  1. pagan, heathen
  2. a devil, an evil spirit

Declension edit

Declension of pagan (ÕS type 2/õpik, no gradation)
singular plural
nominative pagan paganad
accusative nom.
gen. pagana
genitive paganate
partitive paganat paganaid
illative paganasse paganatesse
paganaisse
inessive paganas paganates
paganais
elative paganast paganatest
paganaist
allative paganale paganatele
paganaile
adessive paganal paganatel
paganail
ablative paganalt paganatelt
paganailt
translative paganaks paganateks
paganaiks
terminative paganani paganateni
essive paganana paganatena
abessive paganata paganateta
comitative paganaga paganatega

Derived terms edit

Interjection edit

pagan

  1. damn, darn, heck

Galician edit

Verb edit

pagan

  1. third-person plural present indicative of pagar

Livvi edit

Etymology edit

From Old Church Slavonic поганъ (poganŭ). Related to Finnish pakana (pagan) and Ingrian pakana.

Noun edit

pagan (genitive paganan, partitive [please provide])

  1. pagan, heathen
  2. sage, seer

Adjective edit

pagan (genitive paganan, partitive [please provide])

  1. dirty, unclean

References edit

  • Pertti Virtaranta; Raija Koponen (2009), “pakana”, in Marja Torikka, editor, Karjalan kielen sanakirja, Helsinki: Kotus, →ISSN

Old High German edit

Verb edit

pāgan

  1. (Bavaria) Alternative form of bāgan

Spanish edit

Verb edit

pagan

  1. third-person plural present indicative of pagar

Volapük edit

Etymology edit

From pag (paganism) +‎ -an.

Noun edit

pagan (nominative plural pagans)

  1. (Volapük Nulik) pagan, gentile

Declension edit