See also: else and Else

DanishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From -ilse, later -ælsæ, from Old Saxon -isli, -islo. Also used to represent the Middle Low German suffix -nisse.

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /-əlsə/, [-əlsə]

SuffixEdit

-else c (singular definite -elsen, plural indefinite -elser, plural definite -elserne)

  1. added to a verb to form a noun for an action or process
  2. the result of, or something related to, such an action or process

SynonymsEdit

Derived termsEdit

DescendantsEdit

  • Norwegian Bokmål: -else

Low GermanEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Middle Low German -else, from Old Saxon -isli, -islo; from Proto-West Germanic *-islī.

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /əlsə/, [(ə)lzə]

SuffixEdit

-else n

  1. Creating, from a verb, a noun which is created by the action of this verb (not necessarily one with which the verb is supposed to be done).
    Backelse (pastry): that which is baked (in a wider sense anything baked like bread and cakes) — from backen (to bake)
    Radelse (riddle): that which is guessed — from raden (to guess); compare German Rätsel, Dutch raadsel, Old English rǣdelse
    Riemelse (rhyme): that which is rhymed — from riemen (to rhyme)

Middle Low GermanEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old Saxon -isli, from Proto-West Germanic *-islī.

PronunciationEdit

SuffixEdit

-else

  1. Creating a noun from a verb, denoting something on which the verb is performed.
    ên backelse
    a baked good; literally 'that which is created by baking'
  2. Creating a noun from a verb, denoting an object which is used to perform the verb.
    ên deckelse
    a cover, a roof, a wrapping; literally 'that which is used to cover'

Norwegian BokmålEdit

EtymologyEdit

Mostly from Danish -else, from Old Danish -ælsæ -ilse, with metathesis of -sl- to -ls- from Old Saxon -isli, -islo.

Also from West Germanic loanwords, partly with with metathesis of suffixes -sel and -sle from Middle Low German -nisse, from Old Saxon -nissi, from Proto-West Germanic *-nassī (forms abstract nouns), from *-nass, from Proto-Germanic *-inassuz + *-ī, from Proto-Germanic *-į̄, from Proto-Indo-European *-i-h₂, from *-h₂ (creates collective nouns).

PronunciationEdit

SuffixEdit

-else m or n (definite singular neuter -elset or definite singular masculine -elsen, indefinite plural -elser, definite plural -elsene or -elsa)

  1. Used to form verbal nouns denoting an action.
    avgjørelse, forståelse, anfektelse, bebudelse, oppstandelsedecision, understanding, challenge, proclamation, resurrection
  2. Used to form verbal nouns synonymous with the -ing ending.
    drøftelse, oversettelse, tilretteleggelse, utdannelsediscussion, translation, facilitation, education
  3. Used to form verbal nouns denoting a different meaning than the -ing ending.
    forbindelse, lignelseconnection, parable
  4. Used to form verbal nouns with a specific meaning, usually the result of an action
    skrivelse, spøkelse, stivelsewriting, ghost, starch

Derived termsEdit

See alsoEdit

ReferencesEdit

AnagramsEdit


Old EnglishEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

A metathetic form of Proto-West Germanic *-islī.

PronunciationEdit

SuffixEdit

-else

  1. (feminine suffix for inanimate objects) suffix creating nouns from verbs
    rǣdelsecounsel, advise, riddle, enigma
    myrrelse, mierrelsean offense, scandal; stumblingblock

DeclensionEdit

SynonymsEdit

DescendantsEdit


SwedishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old Saxon -isli, -islo. Also used to represent the Middle Low German suffix -nisse.

SuffixEdit

-else c

  1. suffix creating nouns from verbs

Derived termsEdit