See also: Sele, śele, and селе

EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Middle English sele (happiness, good fortune, bliss; an occasion, period of time), from Old English sǣl, sel

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

sele (countable and uncountable, plural seles)

  1. (obsolete or dialectal) Happiness, fortune.
  2. (obsolete or dialectal) The right time or occasion for something, an opportune moment.
  3. greeting, salutation
    • 1862, George Borrow, “Chapter XXXV”, in Wild Wales Its People‚ Language and Scenery[1] (Fiction), Read Central:
      I found my friend honest Pritchard smoking his morning pipe at the front door, and after giving him the sele of the day, ...
    • 1897, William Morris, “Chapter XIV. The Black Knight Tells the Truth of Himself”, in The Water of the Wondrous Isles (Fantasy), Project Gutenberg, published 2005:
      When the morning was come ... so she arose and thrust her grief back into her heart, and gave her fellow-farer the sele of the day, ...

AnagramsEdit


AsturianEdit

AdjectiveEdit

sele (epicene, plural seles)

  1. calm, tranquil

CzechEdit

PronunciationEdit

Etymology 1Edit

NounEdit

sele n

  1. piglet
DeclensionEdit

Further readingEdit

Etymology 2Edit

See the etymology of the main entry.

NounEdit

sele

  1. locative singular of selo
SynonymsEdit

AnagramsEdit


FijianEdit

NounEdit

sele

  1. knife

VerbEdit

sele

  1. cut (with a knife)

Middle EnglishEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old English sǣl, from Proto-West Germanic *sālī, in turn from Proto-Germanic *sēliz.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

sele (plural seles)

  1. happiness, prosperity, fortune
  2. time, duration, season

DescendantsEdit

  • English: sele, seel
  • Scots: seil

Norwegian BokmålEdit

 
Norwegian Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia no

EtymologyEdit

From Old Norse seli, sili

NounEdit

sele m (definite singular selen, indefinite plural seler, definite plural selene)

  1. a harness (usually for horses, dogs and small children)
  2. braces (UK) or suspenders (US) (used on trousers)

Derived termsEdit

ReferencesEdit


Norwegian NynorskEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old Norse seli, sili

NounEdit

sele m (definite singular selen, indefinite plural selar, definite plural selane)

  1. a harness (usually for horses, dogs and small children)
  2. braces (UK) or suspenders (US) (used on trousers)

Derived termsEdit

ReferencesEdit


Old EnglishEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-West Germanic *sali, from Proto-Germanic *saliz, from Proto-Indo-European *sel-.

Cognate with Old Saxon seli, Old High German sali, Old Norse salr (Swedish sal), Lombardic sala; and with Old Church Slavonic село (selo), Russian село́ (seló). There was also a Germanic variant *saloz-, Old English sæl (great hall, (large) house, castle).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

sele m (nominative plural selas)

  1. great hall, house, dwelling, prison
    Winter ýþe beleác ísgebinde óþ ðæt óðer com geár in geardas swá nú gyt déþ ða ðe sele bewitiaþ wuldortorhtan weder.Winter locks the waves with bonds of ice until another year came to the dwellings of those who keep a constant watch for good weather. (Beowulf)
  2. tabernacle, gesele

DeclensionEdit

Derived termsEdit

ReferencesEdit


Old FrenchEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin sella.

NounEdit

sele f (oblique plural seles, nominative singular sele, nominative plural seles)

  1. saddle (equipment used on a horse)

Related termsEdit

DescendantsEdit


Old FrisianEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-West Germanic *saiwalu

NounEdit

sēle f

  1. soul, life

InflectionEdit

Strong feminine o-stem

ReferencesEdit

  1. Köbler, Gerhard, Altfriesisches Wörterbuch, (4. Auflage) 2014

PortugueseEdit

VerbEdit

sele

  1. first-person singular present subjunctive of selar
  2. third-person singular present subjunctive of selar
  3. first-person singular imperative of selar
  4. third-person singular imperative of selar

SothoEdit

EnumerativeEdit

sele

  1. other

TurkishEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Arabic سَلَّة(salla), from Classical Syriac ܣܰܐܠܳܐ(sallətā, basket).

NounEdit

sele (definite accusative seleyi, plural seleler)

  1. a wide wicker basket

DeclensionEdit

Inflection
Nominative sele
Definite accusative seleyi
Singular Plural
Nominative sele seleler
Definite accusative seleyi seleleri
Dative seleye selelere
Locative selede selelerde
Ablative seleden selelerden
Genitive selenin selelerin
Possessive forms
Singular Plural
1st singular selem selelerim
2nd singular selen selelerin
3rd singular selesi seleleri
1st plural selemiz selelerimiz
2nd plural seleniz seleleriniz
3rd plural seleleri seleleri

Etymology 2Edit

From French selle.

NounEdit

sele (definite accusative seleyi, plural seleler)

  1. saddle (of a bicycle)

DeclensionEdit

Inflection
Nominative sele
Definite accusative seleyi
Singular Plural
Nominative sele seleler
Definite accusative seleyi seleleri
Dative seleye selelere
Locative selede selelerde
Ablative seleden selelerden
Genitive selenin selelerin
Possessive forms
Singular Plural
1st singular selem selelerim
2nd singular selen selelerin
3rd singular selesi seleleri
1st plural selemiz selelerimiz
2nd plural seleniz seleleriniz
3rd plural seleleri seleleri

Etymology 3Edit

NounEdit

sele (definite accusative seleyi, plural seleler)

  1. Alternative form of sere

ReferencesEdit

  • sele in Turkish dictionaries at Türk Dil Kurumu