See also: cicero, Ciceró, and Cícero

EnglishEdit

 
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First-century C.E. bust of Cicero in the Capitoline Museums, Rome

EtymologyEdit

From Latin Cicerō, a cognomen in reference to warts (cicer = chickpea). The Latinate form, based on the nominative, displaced Middle English Ciceroun, based on the oblique stem.

PronunciationEdit

Proper nounEdit

Cicero

  1. The Roman statesman and orator Mārcus Tullius Cicerō (106–43 BC).

TranslationsEdit


DanishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin Cicerō

PronunciationEdit

Proper nounEdit

Cicero

  1. Cicero

GermanEdit

 
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EtymologyEdit

From its use in publishing Pannartz and Sweynheim's 1468 edition of Cicero's Epistulae ad Familiares ("Letters to My Friends").

NounEdit

Cicero

  1. (uncountable, printing, dated) cicero, the 5th of the 7 traditional German sizes of type, between Korpus and Mittel, standardized as 12 point.

LatinEdit

EtymologyEdit

From cicer (chickpea) +‎ (suffix forming cognomina), probably in reference to an ancestor’s warts (as none can be seen in any of his portrayals, all done during a time when it was commonplace for artists to sculpt their clients as they were).

PronunciationEdit

Proper nounEdit

Cicerō m sg (genitive Cicerōnis); third declension

  1. The cognomen (final name) of Marcus Tullius Cicero, a Roman statesman, writer, and orator

DeclensionEdit

Third-declension noun, singular only.

Case Singular
Nominative Cicerō
Genitive Cicerōnis
Dative Cicerōnī
Accusative Cicerōnem
Ablative Cicerōne
Vocative Cicerō

Derived termsEdit

DescendantsEdit

ReferencesEdit

  • Cicero in Charlton T. Lewis and Charles Short (1879) A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press
  • Cicero in Gaffiot, Félix (1934) Dictionnaire illustré Latin-Français, Hachette