See also: dane, daně, dañe, dañé, Däne, and dåne

EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Middle English Dane, from Old Norse Danir. Displaced native Old English Dene. Both forms ultimately descend from Proto-Germanic *daniz.

PronunciationEdit

  • (UK) IPA(key): /deɪn/
  • (file)
  • Rhymes: -eɪn

NounEdit

Dane (plural Danes)

  1. A person from Denmark or of Danish descent.
  2. (historical) A member of the Danes, a Germanic tribe inhabiting the Danish islands and parts of southern Sweden.
    • 1881, John Kirby Hedges, The history of Wallingford[1], volume 1, page 170:
      Kenett states that the military works still known by the name of Tadmarten Camp and Hook-Norton Barrow were cast up at this time ; the former, large and round, is judged to be a fortification of the Danes, and the latter, being smaller and rather a quinquangle than a square, of the Saxons.

SynonymsEdit

Derived termsEdit

TranslationsEdit

Proper nounEdit

Dane

  1. A surname for someone who came from Denmark, also a variant of Dean.
    • 1913 Harry Leon Wilson, Bunker Bean, BiblioBazaar, LLC, 2008, →ISBN, page 13
      Often he wrote good ones on casual slips and fancied them his; names like Trevellyan or Montressor or Delancey, with musical prefixes; or a good, short, beautiful, but dignified name like "Gordon Dane". He liked that one. It suggested something.
  2. A male given name transferred from the surname, or from the ethnic term Dane (like Scott or Norman).
    • 1977 Colleen McCullough, The Thorn Birds, Gramercy Books 1998, →ISBN, pages 432-433
      "I'm going to call him Dane."
      "What a queer name! Why? Is it an O'Neill family name? I thought you were finished with the O'Neills."
      "It's got nothing to do with Luke. This is his name, no one else's. - - - I called Justine Justine simply because I liked the name, and I'm calling Dane Dane for the same reason."
      "Well, it does have a nice ring to it," Fee admitted.

AnagramsEdit


CzechEdit

PronunciationEdit

Proper nounEdit

Dane

  1. vocative singular of Dan

Middle EnglishEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

Through Old French Dan, or directly from Old Norse Danir, in turn from Proto-Germanic *daniz. Displaced native Old English Dene.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

Dane (plural Danes)

  1. Dane

DescendantsEdit

  • English: Dane