EnglishEdit

 
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EtymologyEdit

Name of an early saint, from Latin Georgius, from Ancient Greek Γεώργιος (Geṓrgios), from γεωργός (geōrgós, farmer, earth worker), from γῆ (, earth) (combining form γεω- (geō-)) + ἔργον (érgon, work). (aircraft autopilot): probably named after George DeBeeson, who patented an early autopilot system.

PronunciationEdit

  • (UK) IPA(key): /dʒɔː(ɹ)dʒ/
  • (file)
  • Rhymes: -ɔː(ɹ)dʒ

Proper nounEdit

George

  1. A male given name from Ancient Greek
    • 1590s, William Shakespeare, Richard III: Act V, Scene III. In: The tragedy of King Richard the third. Containing, [...] As it hath beene lately Acted by the Right honourable the Lord Chamberlaine his seruants. At London [...]. 1597
      Our ancient word of courage faire saint George | Inspire vs with the spleene of fierie Dragons,
    • 1830 Mary Russell Mitford, Our Village: Fourth Series: Cottage Names:
      George and Charles are unlucky in this respect; they have no diminutives, and what a mouthful of monosyllables they are! names royal too, and therefore unshortened. A king must be of a very rare class who could afford to be called by shorthand;
    • 1977 Joyce Grenfell, Nursery School:
      George... don't do that!
  2. An English and Welsh patronymic surname, from given names​.
  3. A French patronymic surname, from given names​.
  4. A German patronymic surname, from given names, a variant of Georg.
  5. An Irish patronymic surname, from Irish, an anglicization of Seoirse.
  6. A diminutive of the female given names Georgina or Georgia; also used in the conjoined name George Ann(e).
    • 1925, [US state of] Georgia's Official Register, page 100:
      Roy Davis Stubbs, Eatonton, Judge. Son of Robert D. and Maud (Middleton) Stubbs. [...] Married Miss George Smith Feb. 14, 1918 in Knoxville, Tenn.
    • 2004, George Sargent Janes Leubuscher, ‎Douglas W. Patton, A Girl Named George: My First Hundred Years
  7. (aviation, slang) The autopilot of an aircraft.
    • 1956, Flying Magazine (volume 59, number 6, page 33)
      "'George' rides in the back, aft of the baggage compartment,” said Aviation Sales Manager, John Brophy, with a smile as he climbed out. [] I switched on the autopilot and turned the turn knob to the left to get the turn-bank indicator to show a one-needle turn. Instantly, George rolled the Cessna into a smooth 10° bank to the left.
    • 1993, Flying (volume 120, page 73)
      I relied on "George" and "Fred"—the autopilot and the flight director—to fly the airplane while I worked my way through []
  8. A town in Western Cape, South Africa; named for George III of the United Kingdom.
  9. A locale in the United States.
    1. A city in Iowa; named for the son of a railroad official.
    2. A city in Washington; named for George Washington, 1st President of the United States.
    3. A ghost town in Missouri; named for postmaster Stephen H. George.

SynonymsEdit

Derived termsEdit

DescendantsEdit

  • Arabic: جورج(jorj)
  • Cebuano: George
  • Chinese: 喬治 (Qiáozhì)
  • Hawaiian: Keoki
  • Japanese: ジョージ (Jōji)
  • Korean: 조지 (Joji)
  • Maori: Hōri
  • Persian: جورج(jorj)
  • Swedish: George

TranslationsEdit

NounEdit

George (plural Georges)

  1. (slang, archaic) A coin bearing King George's profile.
  2. A jewelled figure of St George slaying the dragon, worn by Knights of the Garter.
    • 1908, Sir Ralph Payne-Gallwey, A History of the George Worn on the Scaffold by Charles I (page 93)
      [] the King appears to be wearing a George containing the motto inside the gems, as it is in the jewel at Windsor.

CebuanoEdit

EtymologyEdit

English George.

Proper nounEdit

George

  1. A male given name from Ancient Greek.

ScotsEdit

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /ˈdʒɔr(d)ʒ/, /ˈdʒor(d)ʒ/

Proper nounEdit

George

  1. A male given name, equivalent to English George.

Derived termsEdit


SwedishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From English George. Variant of the standard Swedish Georg. Both names ultimately derive from Ancient Greek Γεώργιος (Geṓrgios), name of a legendary dragon-slaying saint.

Proper nounEdit

George c (genitive Georges)

  1. A male given name.