Georgian

See also: georgian
English Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia
English Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia

EnglishEdit

PronunciationEdit

 
Fresco of Queen Tamar, a Georgian woman – that is, a woman from the country of Georgia (etymology 1)

Etymology 1Edit

Georgia +‎ -an.

NounEdit

Georgian (countable and uncountable, plural Georgians)

  1. (uncountable) The language of Georgia, a country in Eastern Europe.
  2. (countable) A person or a descendant of a person from Georgia, a country in Eastern Europe.
  3. (countable) A native or resident of the state of Georgia in the United States of America.
HypernymsEdit
  • (native or resident of the US state of Georgia): American
HyponymsEdit
  • (language of Georgia): Tush
SynonymsEdit
TranslationsEdit

AdjectiveEdit

Georgian (not comparable)

  1. Of, from, or pertaining to the Eastern European country of Georgia, the Georgian people or the Georgian language.
    • 2011 September 18, Ben Dirs, “Rugby World Cup 2011: England 41 – 10 Georgia”, in BBC Sport[1], archived from the original on 10 June 2016:
      As in their narrow defeat of Argentina last week, England were indisciplined at the breakdown, and if Georgian fly-half Merab Kvirikashvili had remembered his kicking boots, Johnson's side might have been behind at half-time.
  2. Of, from, or pertaining to the U.S. State of Georgia or its Georgian or English dialect.

Derived termsEdit

TranslationsEdit

See alsoEdit

Etymology 2Edit

 
The Circus in Bath, England is an example of Georgian architecture – that is, built during the reign of George II of Great Britain (etymology 2)

George +‎ -ian.

NounEdit

Georgian (plural Georgians)

  1. (historical) A British citizen during the reign of a king named George.

AdjectiveEdit

Georgian (comparative more Georgian, superlative most Georgian)

  1. Of, from, or characteristic of the reigns of Kings George I and George II of Great Britain, and George III and George IV of the United Kingdom (1714–1830).
  2. Pertaining to or characteristic of Stefan George (a German poet).
    • 2001, Martin Travers, Critics of Modernity: The Literature of the Conservative Revolution in Germany, 1890–1933, page 82:
      The same Georgian persona, leonine and sacerdotal (that of the aristocratic priest) appears throughout the reminiscences of all his disciples.
    • 2005, Ernst Osterkamp, “The Legacy of the George Circle”, in Exile, Science and Bildung: The Contested Legacies of German Emigre Intellectuals, page 23:
      Another example of this sterile Georgian orthodoxy is to be found in the case of Ernst Morwitz ...
    • 2012, Paul Fleming, “Bodies: Ernst H. Kantorowicz”, in “Escape to Life”: German Intellectuals in New York: A Compendium on Exile after 1933, page 227:
      Kantorowicz ... warns against confusing a Georgian aesthetic “secret Germany,” which still slumbered in concealment, with contemporary, ‘awakened’ Nazi Germany.

Further readingEdit

Georgian edition of Wiktionary

AnagramsEdit