Lebenswelt

EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From German Lebenswelt:[1] Leben (life) + Welt (world).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

Lebenswelt (usually uncountable, plural Lebenswelten)

  1. (chiefly in the philosophy of Edmund Husserl)[2] The sum total of all immediate phenomena which constitute the world of an individual or of a corporate life; life-world.[1][2]
    • 1999, Simon Blackburn, Think: A compelling introduction to philosophy, chapter 7: The World, section 7: The Eye of the Beholder, page 260 (Oxford University Press, paperback, →ISBN
      The mind, for the idealist, creates the world we live in, the ‘Lebenswelt’ of our thoughts, imaginings, and perceptions.

ReferencesEdit

  1. 1.0 1.1 1.2 ‖Lebenswelt” listed in the Oxford English Dictionary [2nd Ed.; 1989]
  2. 2.0 2.1 “life-world, n.” defined under “life, n.”, listed in the Oxford English Dictionary [Draft revision; June 2009]

GermanEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Leben (life) +‎ Welt (world).

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): [ˈleːbm̩sˌvɛlt], [ˈleːbənsˌvɛlt]
  • (file)

NounEdit

Lebenswelt f (genitive Lebenswelt, plural Lebenswelten)

  1. (living) environment

DeclensionEdit

Further readingEdit