See also: totál

Contents

EnglishEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old French total, from Medieval Latin tōtālis, from tōtus(all, whole, entire), of unknown origin. Perhaps related to Oscan 𐌕𐌏𐌖𐌕𐌏(touto, community, city-state), Umbrian 𐌕𐌏𐌕𐌀𐌌(totam, tribe, acc.), Old English þēod(a nation, people, tribe), from Proto-Indo-European *tewtéh₂(people). More at thede, Dutch.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

total ‎(plural totals)

  1. An amount obtained by the addition of smaller amounts.
    A total of £145 was raised by the bring-and-buy stall.
  2. (informal, mathematics) Sum.
    The total of 4, 5 and 6 is 15.

See alsoEdit

SynonymsEdit

TranslationsEdit

Derived termsEdit

AdjectiveEdit

total ‎(comparative more total, superlative most total)

  1. Entire; relating to the whole of something.
    The total book is rubbish from start to finish.  The total number of votes cast is 3,270.
    • 1915, Emerson Hough, The Purchase Price, chapterII:
      Carried somehow, somewhither, for some reason, on these surging floods, were these travelers, []. Even such a boat as the Mount Vernon offered a total deck space so cramped as to leave secrecy or privacy well out of the question, even had the motley and democratic assemblage of passengers been disposed to accord either.
    • 2013 August 3, “Boundary problems”, in The Economist, volume 408, number 8847:
      Economics is a messy discipline: too fluid to be a science, too rigorous to be an art. Perhaps it is fitting that economists’ most-used metric, gross domestic product (GDP), is a tangle too. GDP measures the total value of output in an economic territory. Its apparent simplicity explains why it is scrutinised down to tenths of a percentage point every month.
  2. (used as an intensifier) Complete; absolute.
    He is a total failure.

SynonymsEdit

Derived termsEdit

TranslationsEdit

VerbEdit

total ‎(third-person singular simple present totals, present participle (UK) totalling or (US) totaling, simple past and past participle (UK) totalled or (US) totaled)

  1. (transitive) To add up; to calculate the sum of.
    When we totalled the takings, we always got a different figure.
  2. To equal a total of; to amount to.
    That totals seven times so far.
  3. (transitive, US, slang) to demolish; to wreck completely. (from total loss)
    Honey, I’m OK, but I’ve totaled the car.
  4. (intransitive) To amount to; to add up to.
    It totals nearly a pound.

SynonymsEdit

TranslationsEdit

AnagramsEdit


AsturianEdit

AdjectiveEdit

total (epicene, plural totales)

  1. total

NounEdit

total m ‎(plural totales)

  1. total

Derived termsEdit


CatalanEdit

AdjectiveEdit

total m, f ‎(masculine and feminine plural totals)

  1. total

NounEdit

total m ‎(plural totals)

  1. total

Derived termsEdit


DanishEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From French total.

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /totaːl/, [tˢoˈtˢæːˀl]

AdjectiveEdit

total

  1. total
InflectionEdit
Inflection of total
Positive Comparative Superlative
Common singular total 2
Neuter singular totalt 2
Plural totale 2
Definite attributive1 totale
1) When an adjective is applied predicatively to something definite, the corresponding "indefinite" form is used.
2) The "indefinite" superlatives may not be used attributively.

NounEdit

total c (singular definite totalen, plural indefinite totaler)

  1. total
InflectionEdit

Etymology 2Edit

Compound of to(two) and tal(number).

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /total/, [ˈtˢotˢal]

NounEdit

total n (singular definite totallet, plural indefinite totaller)

  1. two
SynonymsEdit
InflectionEdit

FrenchEdit

PronunciationEdit

AdjectiveEdit

total m ‎(feminine singular totale, masculine plural totaux, feminine plural totales)

  1. total
  2. perfect

AntonymsEdit

NounEdit

total m ‎(plural totaux)

  1. total

Related termsEdit

External linksEdit


GalicianEdit

AdjectiveEdit

total m, f (plural totais)

  1. complete, entire

NounEdit

total m ‎(plural totais)

  1. total

GermanEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin tōtālis.

PronunciationEdit

AdjectiveEdit

total ‎(not comparable)

  1. total

DeclensionEdit


Norwegian BokmålEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin tōtālis.

AdjectiveEdit

total ‎(neuter singular totalt, definite singular and plural totale)

  1. total

Derived termsEdit

ReferencesEdit


Norwegian NynorskEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin tōtālis.

AdjectiveEdit

total ‎(neuter singular totalt, definite singular and plural totale)

  1. total

Derived termsEdit

ReferencesEdit


PortugueseEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Medieval Latin tōtālis(total), from Latin tōtus(whole) + -ālis(-al).

PronunciationEdit

AdjectiveEdit

total m, f ‎(plural totais, comparable)

  1. complete; entire (to the greatest extent)
    • 2005, Lya Wyler (translator), J. K. Rowling (English author), Harry Potter e o Enigma do Príncipe (Harry Potter and the Half-Blood Prince), Rocco, page 141:
      Quero conversar com os senhores e exijo sua total e absoluta atenção.
      I want to talk with you and I demand your complete and absolute attention.
  2. total (relating to the whole of something)
    A quantidade total de livros nesta biblioteca é mais de um milhão.
    The total amount of books in this library is more than a million.

SynonymsEdit

AntonymsEdit

NounEdit

total m (plural totais)

  1. total (amount obtained by the addition of smaller amounts)
    O total de livros nesta biblioteca é mais de um milhão.
    The total amount of books in this library is more than a million.

SynonymsEdit

Related termsEdit


SpanishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Medieval Latin tōtālis, from tōtus(“all, whole, entire).

AdjectiveEdit

total m, f ‎(plural totales)

  1. total, complete

AdverbEdit

total

  1. (colloquial) basically, so, in short (used to summarise)
    Total, que no puedo venir.
    Basically, I can't come.

NounEdit

total m ‎(plural totales)

  1. total

See alsoEdit

ReferencesEdit