See also: muse, musé, musė, muše, and Muße

EnglishEdit

 
English Wikipedia has articles on:
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Three Musæ: Clio, Euterpe, and Thalia

EtymologyEdit

From Middle English Muse, from Latin Musa, from Ancient Greek Μοῦσα (Moûsa).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

Muse (plural Muses)

  1. One of the nine Ancient Greek deities of the arts.

Usage notesEdit

The plural Musae can also be found, though it is much rarer than Muses.

HyponymsEdit

Related termsEdit

TranslationsEdit

AnagramsEdit


GermanEdit

PronunciationEdit

  • (file)

NounEdit

Muse f (genitive Muse, plural Musen)

  1. A Muse (deity).
  2. A source of inspiration.

Further readingEdit

  • Muse in Duden online

Middle EnglishEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin Mūsa, either directly or from Old French muse. Ultimately from Ancient Greek Μοῦσᾰ (Moûsa).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

Muse (plural Muses)

  1. (Greek mythology) A Muse
  2. A source of inspiration for poetry.
  3. (rare) A kind of music or poem.

Related termsEdit

DescendantsEdit

  • English: Muse, muse
  • Scots: Muse, muse

ReferencesEdit