See also: Musa, musā, mūsā, mūsa, muša, and mušā

AsturianEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin mūsa, from Ancient Greek Μοῦσα (Moûsa, Muse).

NounEdit

musa f (plural muses)

  1. muse (source of inspiration)

Related termsEdit


CatalanEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin mūsa, from Ancient Greek Μοῦσα (Moûsa, Muse).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

musa f (plural muses)

  1. muse (source of inspiration)

Related termsEdit

Further readingEdit


EseEdit

NounEdit

musa

  1. (anatomy) breast

EsperantoEdit

AdjectiveEdit

musa (accusative singular musan, plural musaj, accusative plural musajn)

  1. murine

HypernymsEdit

Related termsEdit


FinnishEdit

EtymologyEdit

Shortening of musiikki (music).

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /ˈmusɑ/, [ˈmus̠ɑ]
  • Rhymes: -usɑ
  • Syllabification: mu‧sa

NounEdit

musa

  1. (colloquial) music

DeclensionEdit

Inflection of musa (Kotus type 10/koira, no gradation)
nominative musa musat
genitive musan musien
partitive musaa musia
illative musaan musiin
singular plural
nominative musa musat
accusative nom. musa musat
gen. musan
genitive musan musien
musainrare
partitive musaa musia
inessive musassa musissa
elative musasta musista
illative musaan musiin
adessive musalla musilla
ablative musalta musilta
allative musalle musille
essive musana musina
translative musaksi musiksi
instructive musin
abessive musatta musitta
comitative musineen
Possessive forms of musa (type koira)
possessor singular plural
1st person musani musamme
2nd person musasi musanne
3rd person musansa

AnagramsEdit


FrenchEdit

PronunciationEdit

VerbEdit

musa

  1. third-person singular past historic of muser

AnagramsEdit


GalicianEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin mūsa, from Ancient Greek Μοῦσα (Moûsa, Muse).

NounEdit

musa f (plural musas)

  1. muse (source of inspiration)

Related termsEdit

Further readingEdit


ItalianEdit

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /ˈmu.za/, [ˈmuːz̪ä]
  • Hyphenation: mù‧sa

Etymology 1Edit

From Latin mūsa/Mūsa, from Ancient Greek μοῦσα (moûsa)/Μοῦσα (Moûsa).

NounEdit

musa f (plural muse)

  1. (Greek mythology, usually capitalized) Muse
    • 1472, Dante Alighieri, La divina commedia: Inferno [The Divine Comedy: Hell] (paperback), 12th edition, Le Monnier, published 1994, Canto II, lines 7–9, page 21:
      O muse, o alto ingegno, or m'aiutate; ¶ o mente che scrivesti ciò ch'io vidi, ¶ qui si parrà la tua nobilitate. []
      O Muses, O high genius, now assist me! ¶ O memory, that didst write down what I saw, ¶ here thy nobility shall be manifest!
    • 1581, Torquato Tasso, Gerusalemme liberata [Jerusalem Delivered]‎[1], Erasmo Viotti, Canto I, page 2:
      O Muſa, tu, che di caduchi allori ¶ non circondi la fronte in Elicona ¶ ma sù nel cielo infra beati chori ¶ hai di ſtelle immortali aurea corona []
      O Muse, you who don't encircle your head with caducous laurel in Helicon, but instead, among blessed choirs up in the sky, have a golden crown of immortal stars []
    • 1822, Ippolito Pindemonte, transl., Odissea [Odyssey]‎[2], translation of Ὀδύσσεια (Odýsseia) by Homer, Book I, page 1:
      Musa, quell’uom di moltiforme ingegno ¶ dimmi, che molto errò, poich’ebbe a terra ¶ gittate d’Iliòn le sacre torri; []
      O Muse, tell me about that man of multiform ingenuity, that much wandered after bringing down the sacred towers of Troy []
  2. (figuratively)
    1. poetic inspiration
    2. (by extension) poetry
    3. poet

Etymology 2Edit

From Late Latin musa, from Arabic مَوْزَة(mawza).

NounEdit

musa f (plural muse)

  1. The Musa taxonomic genus.

AnagramsEdit


LatinEdit

PronunciationEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Ancient Greek μοῦσα (moûsa). Akin to mēns (mind, reason).

NounEdit

mūsa f (genitive mūsae); first declension

  1. song, poem
  2. (in the plural) studies, sciences
DeclensionEdit

First-declension noun.

Case Singular Plural
Nominative mūsa mūsae
Genitive mūsae mūsārum
Dative mūsae mūsīs
Accusative mūsam mūsās
Ablative mūsā mūsīs
Vocative mūsa mūsae
Related termsEdit

ReferencesEdit

  • musa in Charles du Fresne du Cange’s Glossarium Mediæ et Infimæ Latinitatis (augmented edition, 1883–1887)
  • musa in Harry Thurston Peck, editor (1898) Harper's Dictionary of Classical Antiquities, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • musa in William Smith, editor (1848) A Dictionary of Greek Biography and Mythology, London: John Murray

Etymology 2Edit

From Arabic مَوْزَة(mawza), singulative of مَوْز(mawz). Attested in Latin since the 14th century.

NounEdit

mūsa f (genitive mūsae); first declension

  1. (Medieval Latin) banana
    • 14th century, Symon Semeonis, Itinerarium Symonis Semeonis ab Hybernia ad Terram Sanctam 40:
      Non enim sunt arboris poma, sed cujusdam herbe in altum crescentis ad modum arboris, que musa appellatur; cujus folia in figura et colore foliis cujusdam herbe, que anglice dicitur radigche, multumque assimilantur, quamvis in longitudine et latitudine illa multum excedant.
      They're not fruit from a tree, but from a plant that grows up in the manner of the trees, called the musa. In terms of shape and colour, its leaves resemble very much those of a plant that the English call radigche [radish], although they exceed these a lot in both length and width.
SynonymsEdit
DescendantsEdit
  • Translingual: Musa
ReferencesEdit
  • "musa". Dictionary of Medieval Latin from British Sources.

Norwegian BokmålEdit

Alternative formsEdit

NounEdit

musa m or f

  1. definite feminine singular of mus

Norwegian NynorskEdit

NounEdit

musa f

  1. definite singular of mus

OccitanEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin mūsa, from Ancient Greek Μοῦσα (Moûsa, Muse).

PronunciationEdit

  • (file)

NounEdit

musa f (plural musas)

  1. muse (source of inspiration)

PhuthiEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-Nguni *úmusá.

NounEdit

musa? class 3

  1. kindness

InflectionEdit

This noun needs an inflection-table template.


PortugueseEdit

 
Portuguese Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia pt
 
musas

EtymologyEdit

From Latin mūsa, from Ancient Greek Μοῦσα (Moûsa, Muse).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

musa f (plural musas)

  1. Muse
  2. muse (a source of inspiration)
  3. A poet's creative and poetic genius.

SynonymsEdit

Related termsEdit


SpanishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin mūsa, from Ancient Greek Μοῦσα (Moûsa).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

musa f (plural musas)

  1. Muse
  2. muse (a source of inspiration)
  3. A poet's creative and poetic genius.
  4. (literary) poetry

SynonymsEdit

Related termsEdit

ReferencesEdit


XhosaEdit

EtymologyEdit

(This etymology is missing or incomplete. Please add to it, or discuss it at the Etymology scriptorium.)

InterjectionEdit

musa (to one person, to multiple people musani)

  1. (with infinitive) don't

ZuluEdit

EtymologyEdit

(This etymology is missing or incomplete. Please add to it, or discuss it at the Etymology scriptorium.)

PronunciationEdit

InterjectionEdit

musa (to one person, to multiple people musani)

  1. (with infinitive) don't
    Synonym: kahle

ReferencesEdit