See also: plage and plagë

Contents

GermanEdit

EtymologyEdit

From early Middle High German plāge, from Latin plāga(blow, wound). The word was originally chiefly Central German, therefore sometimes secondarily adapted to the Upper German consonantism as (later) Middle High German pflāge, which form did not last, however. More at plague.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

Plage f ‎(genitive Plage, plural Plagen)

  1. plague (affliction or hardship, particularly when seen as a divine punishment)
    Sie ertrug alle Plagen des Krieges mit großer Tapferkeit.
    She endured all hardships of the war with great bravery.
    Manche Menschen erachten Aids als Plage für die Unzüchtigen.
    Some people consider AIDS to be a plague for the lewd.
  2. plague; epidemic
    In Teilen des Landes ist eine Mückenplage ausgebrochen.
    A mosquito plague has broken out in parts of the country.
  3. (informal) nuisance; annoyance; something annoying
    Diese neuen Glühbirnen sind echt ’ne Plage.
    These new light bulbs are really annoying.

Usage notesEdit

DeclensionEdit

SynonymsEdit

Related termsEdit

External linksEdit


LuxembourgishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From French plage.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

Plage f ‎(plural Plagen)

  1. beach