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GermanEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Middle High German sameztac, samztac, from Old High German sambaztag (Sabbath day), from Gothic *𐍃𐌰𐌼𐌱𐌰𐍄𐍉 (*sambatō), an alteration (possibly dialectal) of earlier, Biblical 𐍃𐌰𐌱𐌱𐌰𐍄𐍉 (sabbatō). The altered Gothic form derives from Byzantine Greek *σάμβατον (*sámbaton, Sabbath). Compare French samedi, Old French sambedi, Romansch somda, Romanian sâmbătă, Hungarian szombat, Old Church Slavonic сѫбота (sǫbota).

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /ˈzamstʰaːk/ (standard)
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  • IPA(key): /ˈzamstʰax/ (northern Germany and parts of central Germany; chiefly colloquial)
  • IPA(key): /ˈzamstʰaːx/ (parts of central Germany; chiefly colloquial)
  • IPA(key): /ˈsamʃtʰaːk/ (south-western Germany and Switzerland; dialect)

NounEdit

Samstag m (genitive Samstags or Samstages, plural Samstage)

  1. (now dominant except in former East Germany) Saturday
DeclensionEdit

Usage notesEdit

Samstag is a common word for “Saturday” in western Germany, southern Germany, Austria, and Switzerland (in standard usage). See Sonnabend for information on this synonym.

SynonymsEdit

  • (eastern and, traditionally, northern Germany): Sonnabend

HypernymsEdit

Derived termsEdit

See alsoEdit

Further readingEdit