See also: western

English edit

 
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Pronunciation edit

  • (file)
  • Rhymes: -ɛstə(ɹ)n

Adjective edit

Western (comparative more Western, superlative most Western)

  1. Of, situated in, or related to the West
    • "As Western culture became increasingly mechanized in the 1600s, the female earth and virgin earth spirit were subdued by the machine." (The Death of Nature, "Nature as Female" by Carolyn Merchant)
    • 1911, Theodore Dreiser, chapter LVI, in Jennie Gerhardt[1]:
      He would be as happy with her as he would be with Jennie—almost—and he would have the satisfaction of knowing that this Western social and financial world held no more significant figure than himself.
    • 1985 August 11, Robert D. McFadden, “IDA PRUITT, 96, WHO FOSTERED FRIENDSHIP WITH THE CHINESE”, in The New York Times[2], →ISSN, →OCLC, archived from the original on 24 May 2015, Section 1, page 36[3]:
      Born in Penglai, on the coast of Shandong, in 1888, Miss Pruitt grew up in an inland village where for many years hers was the only Western family.
  2. (South Korea) From Europe.
  3. Of or pertaining to a certain genre of film, television, literature, and so on, dealing with the American Old West.

Antonyms edit

Translations edit

Noun edit

Western (plural Westerns)

  1. Alternative letter-case form of western
  2. (dated) An inhabitant of a western region or country; a westerner.
    • 1909, Theodore Leighton Pennell, Among the Wild Tribes of the Afghan Frontier:
      If, again, after studying the life and words of Christ, and comparing them with the Christianity which they see practised in the West, or in the Westerns who reside among them, they are not drawn to Western Christianity []

Proper noun edit

Western

  1. A surname.
  2. A village in Saline County, Nebraska, United States.
  3. A town in Oneida County, New York, United States.

Further reading edit

  • "Western" in Raymond Williams, Keywords (revised), 1983, Fontana Press, page 333.

Anagrams edit

German edit

Etymology edit

Borrowed from English western.

Pronunciation edit

Noun edit

Western m (strong, genitive Westerns or Western, plural Western)

  1. (film) western

Declension edit

Derived terms edit

Further reading edit