abactor

EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Late Latin abactor (cattle rustler), from abigō (drive away); from ab (from, away from) + agō (drive).[1]

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

abactor (plural abactors)

  1. (law, obsolete) One who steals and drives away cattle or beasts by herds or droves; a cattle rustler. [Attested from the mid 17th century until the early 19th century.][2]

SynonymsEdit

TranslationsEdit

The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Help:How to check translations.

AnagramsEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ Philip Babcock Gove (editor), Webster's Third International Dictionary of the English Language, Unabridged (G. & C. Merriam Co., 1976 [1909], ISBN 0-87779-101-5), page 3
  2. ^ Lesley Brown (editor), The Shorter Oxford English Dictionary, 5th edition (Oxford University Press, 2003 [1933], ISBN 978-0-19-860575-7), page 2

LatinEdit

EtymologyEdit

From abigō (drive away), from ab (from, away from) + agō (drive).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

abactor m (genitive abactōris); third declension

  1. A cattle thief; abactor or rustler.
  2. A man who abducts.
  3. vocative singular of abactor

InflectionEdit

Third declension.

Number Singular Plural
nominative abactor abactōrēs
genitive abactōris abactōrum
dative abactōrī abactōribus
accusative abactōrem abactōrēs
ablative abactōre abactōribus
vocative abactor abactōrēs

SynonymsEdit

Related termsEdit

DescendantsEdit


PortugueseEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin abactor.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

abactor m (plural abactores, feminine abactora, feminine plural abactoras)

  1. abactor (cattle thief)

SynonymsEdit

Related termsEdit

Last modified on 10 February 2014, at 21:24