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See also: Ago, AGO, agó, aĝo, ägo, and -ago

Contents

EnglishEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Middle English ago, agon (passed), past participle of agon (to depart, escape, pass), from Old English āgān (to go away, pass away, go forth, come to pass), from Proto-Germanic *uz- (out), *gāną (to go), equivalent to a- +‎ gone. Cognate with German ergehen (to come to pass, fare, go forth). Compare also Old Saxon āgangan (to go or pass by), Gothic 𐌿𐍃𐌲𐌰𐌲𐌲𐌰𐌽 (usgaggan, to go forth).

PronunciationEdit

AdjectiveEdit

ago (comparative more ago, superlative most ago)

  1. (archaic or dialectal) Gone; gone by; gone away; passed; passed away.
    in days ago/in days agone
  2. (archaic or dialectal) Nearly gone; dead (used in Devonshire at the turn of the 19th century)

Usage notesEdit

  • Usually follows the noun.

PostpositionEdit

ago

  1. Before now.
    I got married ten years ago.   The last slice of cake was gone long ago.

Derived termsEdit

TranslationsEdit

See alsoEdit

ReferencesEdit

  • G. A. Cooke, The County of Devon

AnagramsEdit


AlbanianEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Ottoman Turkish آغا (ağa) (compare Turkish ağa) or Greek άγιος (ágios).

NounEdit

ago m

  1. (Gheg, archaic, poetic) god

EsperantoEdit

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /ˈaɡo/
  • Hyphenation: a‧go

NounEdit

ago (accusative singular agon, plural agoj, accusative plural agojn)

  1. act, action

SynonymsEdit

Derived termsEdit


IdoEdit

NounEdit

ago (plural agi)

  1. act, action, deed

SynonymsEdit

Derived termsEdit


IstriotEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin acus.

NounEdit

ago m

  1. needle

ItalianEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin acus (needle), from Proto-Indo-European *h₂eḱ- (sharp). Compare Romanian ac.

NounEdit

ago m (plural aghi)

  1. needle
    • 1947, Primo Levi, “Storia di dieci giorni”, in Se questo è un uomo [If This Is a Man], Torino: Einaudi, published 1987, →ISBN, page 190:
      Grazie alla mia ormai lunga esperienza delle cose del campo; ero riuscito a portare con me le mie cose personali: una cintura di fili elettrici intrecciati; il cucchiaio-coltello; un ago con tre gugliate; cinque bottoni; e infine, diciotto pietrine per acciarino che avevo rubato in Laboratoria.

Related termsEdit

Derived termsEdit


JapaneseEdit

RomanizationEdit

ago

  1. Rōmaji transcription of あご

Karipúna Creole FrenchEdit

PronunciationEdit

InterjectionEdit

ago?

  1. may I come in?

ReferencesEdit

  • 1987, Alfred W. Tobler, Dicionário Crioulo Karipúna/Português Português/Crioulo Karípúna, Summer Institute of Linguistics, page 43.

LatinEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-Italic *agō, from Proto-Indo-European *h₂éǵeti.

Cognate with Old Irish aigid, Ancient Greek ἄγω (ágō, I lead), Old Norse aka (move, drive), Avestan 𐬀𐬰𐬀𐬌𐬙𐬌 (azaiti), Sanskrit अजति (ájati, to drive, propel, cast).

PronunciationEdit

VerbEdit

agō (present infinitive agere, perfect active ēgī, supine āctum); third conjugation

  1. I do, act, make, behave
    • 63 BCE, Cicero, Catiline Orations (Latin text and English translations here)
      Nihil agis, nihil moliris, nihil cogitas quod non ego non modo audiam sed etiam videam planeque sentiam.
      "You do nothing, you plan nothing, you think of nothing which I not only do not hear, but which I do not see and know every particular of."
    • 405, Jerome and others, Vulgate, Paralipomenon II 32:7
      viriliter agite et confortamini nolite timere nec paveatis regem Assyriorum []
      "Act strongly and be courageous. Do not fear nor tremble before the king of Assyria"
  2. I accomplish, manage, achieve
  3. I perform, transact
  4. I drive, conduct
    • 1877, Sophocles (in translation), Electra, in Aeschyli et Sophoclis: Tragoediae et Fragmenta (Paris: Institutiae Franciae Typographo)
      Interea Orestes postremus omnium ultimo loco equos agebat, in fine certam spem victoriae ponens.
      "Meanwhile, Orestes had been driving in last place and holding his horses back, putting his trust in the finish."
  5. I push, move, impel
  6. I guide, govern, administer
  7. I discuss, plead, deliberate
  8. I think upon; I am occupied with
  9. I stir up, excite, cause, induce
  10. I chase, pursue
  11. I drive at, pursue (a course of action)
  12. I rob, steal, plunder, carry off
  13. (of time) I pass, spend
  14. (of offerings) I slay, kill (as a sacrifice)
  15. (of plants) I put forth, sprout, extend

InflectionEdit

   Conjugation of ago (third conjugation)
indicative singular plural
first second third first second third
active present agō agis agit agimus agitis agunt
imperfect agēbam agēbās agēbat agēbāmus agēbātis agēbant
future agam agēs aget agēmus agētis agent
perfect ēgī ēgistī ēgit ēgimus ēgistis ēgērunt, ēgēre
pluperfect ēgeram ēgerās ēgerat ēgerāmus ēgerātis ēgerant
future perfect ēgerō ēgeris ēgerit ēgerimus ēgeritis ēgerint
passive present agor ageris, agere agitur agimur agiminī aguntur
imperfect agēbar agēbāris, agēbāre agēbātur agēbāmur agēbāminī agēbantur
future agar agēris, agēre agētur agēmur agēminī agentur
perfect āctus + present active indicative of sum
pluperfect āctus + imperfect active indicative of sum
future perfect āctus + future active indicative of sum
subjunctive singular plural
first second third first second third
active present agam agās agat agāmus agātis agant
imperfect agerem agerēs ageret agerēmus agerētis agerent
perfect ēgerim ēgerīs ēgerit ēgerīmus ēgerītis ēgerint
pluperfect ēgissem ēgissēs ēgisset ēgissēmus ēgissētis ēgissent
passive present agar agāris, agāre agātur agāmur agāminī agantur
imperfect agerer agerēris, agerēre agerētur agerēmur agerēminī agerentur
perfect āctus + present active subjunctive of sum
pluperfect āctus + imperfect active subjunctive of sum
imperative singular plural
first second third first second third
active present age agite
future agitō agitō agitōte aguntō
passive present agere agiminī
future agitor agitor aguntor
non-finite forms active passive
present perfect future present perfect future
infinitives agere ēgisse āctūrus esse agī āctus esse āctum īrī
participles agēns āctūrus āctus agendus
verbal nouns gerund supine
nominative genitive dative/ablative accusative accusative ablative
agere agendī agendō agendum āctum āctū

Derived termsEdit

Related termsEdit

DescendantsEdit

ReferencesEdit

  • ago in Charlton T. Lewis and Charles Short (1879) A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press
  • ago in Charlton T. Lewis (1891) An Elementary Latin Dictionary, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • ago in Charles du Fresne du Cange’s Glossarium Mediæ et Infimæ Latinitatis (augmented edition, 1883–1887)
  • Carl Meissner; Henry William Auden (1894) Latin Phrase-Book[1], London: Macmillan and Co.
    • to take root: radices agere (De Off. 2. 12. 73)
    • to bud, blossom: gemmas agere
    • to live (all) one's life (honourably, in the country, as a man of learning): vitam, aetatem (omnem aetatem, omne aetatis tempus) agere (honeste, ruri, in litteris), degere, traducere
    • I am in my thirteenth year: tertium decimum annum ago
    • to be at one's last gasp: animam agere
    • so-and-so is in a very satisfactory position; prospers: agitur praeclare, bene cum aliquo
    • to be ruined, undone: praecipitem agi, ire
    • a man's life is at stake, is in very great danger: salus, caput, vita alicuius agitur, periclitatur, in discrimine est or versatur
    • to thank a person (in words): gratias alicui agere pro aliqua re
    • to give thanks to heaven: grates agere (dis immortalibus)
    • (ambiguous) to have all one's trouble for nothing: rem actam or simply actum agere (proverb.)
    • to be occupied with business, busy: negotia agere, gerere
    • to pass one's life in luxury and idleness: per luxum et ignaviam aetatem agere
    • to be inattentive: alias res or aliud agere
    • to devote one's life to science, study: aetatem in litteris ducere, agere
    • the point at issue: id, de quo agitur or id quod cadit in controversiam
    • to recite a poem, line with appropriate action: carmen, versum agere
    • to act a play (said of the actors): fabulam agere
    • to play the part of some one: partes agere alicuius
    • to act the rôle of a slave, pander: agere servum, lenonem
    • to represent a thing dramatically: sic exponere aliquid, quasi agatur res (non quasi narretur)
    • to gesticulate: gestum (always in the sing.) agere
    • the question now is..: nunc id quaeritur, agitur
    • to be now jesting, now in earnest: ioca et seria agere
    • the book treats of friendship: hic liber est de amicitia (not agit) or hoc libro agitur de am.
    • to act reasonably, judiciously: prudenter, considerate, consilio agere (opp. temere, nullo consilio, nulla ratione)
    • to be moderate in all things, commit no excess: omnia modice agere
    • to have no principles: omnia temere agere, nullo iudicio uti
    • to thank, glorify the immortal gods: grates, laudes agere dis immortalibus
    • to keep, celebrate a festival: diem festum agere (of an individual)
    • to take the auspices, observe the flight of birds: augurium agere, auspicari (N. D. 2. 4. 11)
    • the house walls are beginning to crack: domus rimas agit
    • to live a lonely life: vitam solitariam agere
    • how are you: quid agis?
    • what is going on? how are you getting on: quid agitur? quid fit?
    • to lay the foundations: fundamenta iacere, agere
    • to drive to pasture: pastum agere
    • to submit a formal proposition to the people: agere cum populo (Leg. 3. 4. 10)
    • the aristocracy (as a party in politics): boni cives, optimi, optimates, also simply boni (opp. improbi); illi, qui optimatium causam agunt
    • to be a leading spirit of the popular cause: populi causam agere
    • to play the demagogue: populariter agere
    • to hold the census: censum habere, agere (Liv. 3. 22)
    • to perform the censors' duties: censuram agere, gerere
    • to go to law with a person: (ex) iure, lege agere cum aliquo
    • to proceed against some one with the utmost rigour of the law; to strain the law in one's favour: summo iure agere cum aliquo (cf. summum ius, summa iniuria)
    • to convene the assizes (used of a provincial governor): conventus agere (B. G. 1. 54)
    • to conduct a person's case (said of an agent, solicitor): causam alicuius agere (apud iudicem)
    • a person's life is in jeopardy: caput alicuius agitur (vid. sect. V. 8)
    • to crucify: in crucem agere, tollere aliquem
    • to set the army in motion: agmen agere
    • to mount guard in the camp: vigilias agere in castris (Verr. 4. 43)
    • to keep watch on the rampart: custodias agere in vallo
    • to be on duty before the gates: stationes agere pro portis
    • to carry off booty: ferre atque agere praedam
    • to advance pent-houses, mantlets: vineas agere (B. G. 3. 21)
    • to make mines, subterraneous passages: cuniculos agere (B. G. 3. 21)
    • to drive the enemy before one: prae se agere hostem
    • to triumph over some one: triumphum agere de or ex aliquo or c. Gen. (victoriae, pugnae)
    • to treat with some one about peace: agere cum aliquo de pace
    • to row: navem remis agere or propellere
    • (ambiguous) I'm undone! it's all up with me: perii! actum est de me! (Ter. Ad. 3. 2. 26)
    • (ambiguous) to have all one's trouble for nothing: rem actam or simply actum agere (proverb.)
    • (ambiguous) it's all over with me; I'm a lost man: actum est de me

Further readingEdit


SamoanEdit

NounEdit

ago

  1. turmeric

Usage notesEdit

Once cooked, it is called lega.


VõroEdit

EtymologyEdit

  This entry lacks etymological information. If you are familiar with the origin of this term, please add it to the page per etymology instructions. You can also discuss it at the Etymology scriptorium.

Related to Estonian agu.

NounEdit

ago (genitive ao, partitive ako)

  1. twilight

InflectionEdit

Derived termsEdit